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Cooley/Gullion Area   Cooley Mountains Subarea
Place count in area: 23, OSI/LPS Maps: 28, 29, 35, 36 
Highest place:
Slieve Foye, 589m
Maximum height for area: 589 metres,     Maximum prominence for area: 494 metres,

Note: this list of places includes island features such as summits, but not islands as such.
Rating graphic.
Slieve Foye Mountain Sliabh Feá A name in Irish
also Carlingford Mountain an extra name in English
(Ir. Sliabh Feá [GE], 'mountain of rushes') County Highpoint of Louth, in County Highpoint, Arderin Lists, Undifferentiated, or layered gabbro 1-4 Bedrock

Height: 589m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29&36A Grid Reference: J16902 11934
Place visited by 568 members. Recently by: TommyMc, PaulNolan, mlmoroneybb, Krumel, PeterKirk, IainT, marchiggins, torbreck, msammon, oakesave, Mike32chp, sarahryanowen, Singo, Bunsen7, DeltaP
I have visited this place: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.216215, Latitude: 54.043405 , Easting: 316902, Northing: 311934 Prominence: 494m,  Isolation: 0.8km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 716824 811942,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvFy, 10 char: SlvFoye
Bedrock type: Undifferentiated, or layered gabbro 1-4, (Layered Gabbro)

Locally the name is understood as Sliabh Fathaigh, 'mountain of the giant', and this ties in with local lore about a giant being discernible among the summit rocks [KM, personal comment]. Also called Carlingford Mountain.   Slieve Foye is the highest mountain in the Cooley/Gullion area and the 301st highest in Ireland. Slieve Foye is the most easterly summit and also the second most southerly in the Cooley/Gullion area. Slieve Foye is the highest point in county Louth.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/?PHPSESSID=jkvj7bmj2fv8f3avlom0uomvm2
COMMENTS for Slieve Foye << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 .. 8 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Foye in area Cooley/Gullion, Ireland
Picture: Jason on the shoulder between Barnavave and Slieve Foye
 
paulocon on Slieve Foye, 2008
by paulocon  30 Nov 2008
With seemingly the whole of the East Coast and perhaps much of the country coated in thick fog and severe frost, we took the M1 north towards Carlingford and were passed by a seemingly unending line of traffic as shoppers made their way relentlessy across the border to Newry leaving the crumbling remants of the Celtic Tiger in their wake. Leaving the madness of the motorway and nearing the town, we were treated to a truly awesome sight as Slieve Foye emerged almost magically from the fog, it's slopes illuminated by the superb early morning winter sun. Across from Foye were the Mournes, their slopes also brightly lit whilst in the middle sat Carlinford Lough covered by thick white low-lying cloud in a manner similar to icing on a Christmas cake. We tackled Slieve Foye from the carpark at the Tourist Office, following the signs for the Tain Trail. We missed the turn uphill (not signposted) but were directed back on track by a very kind woman who mentioned that our mistake was a very common one. We followed the track all the way up to the obvious ridge between Foye and Barnavave before swinging right off the Tain trail towards Slieve Foye (another marked track). Conditions underfoot were perfect, the boggy ground hardened by the sharp frost. We soon arrived at the summit with the contrast between the sun-drenched southern slopes and frost-covered northern side very striking. Stunning views from atop the mountain with the tops of the distant Wicklow Moutains poking up through the cloud cover which still lay across much of the country. All in all, a fantastic and very enjoyable walk in exceptional conditions. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/298/comment/3461/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
The dog brought me for a walk on Sunday 14th Marc .. by Moac   (Show all for Slieve Foye)
 
Fantastic wee hill for a short day. Fine views in .. by ricky k   (Show all for Slieve Foye)
 
Last Saturday, a trio of us headed up Sliabh Foye .. by davema   (Show all for Slieve Foye)
 
Fittingly, this was my last of the Cooley/Gullion .. by dr_banuska   (Show all for Slieve Foye)
 
Yes! This is an exceptional mountain! The views i .. by CaptainVertigo   (Show all for Slieve Foye)
 
COMMENTS for Slieve Foye << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 .. 8 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Slieve Foye.)

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