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Slieve Beg Mountain Sliabh Beag A name in Irish
(Ir. Sliabh Beag [PNNI], 'little mountain') Down County, in Arderin List, Granite granophyre Bedrock

Height: 595.9m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 29 Grid Reference: J34046 27603 This summit has been logged as climbed by 320 members. Recently by: David-Guenot, feargalf, IainT, bryanjbarry, DelStewart, lw24, tommccarthy, roscorrocket, MichaelG55, stevebullers, DesHoulihan, PPruz, DrMonkfish, strangeweaver, jimantz99
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -5.947707, Latitude: 54.179924 , Easting: 334047, Northing: 327604 Prominence: 40.87m,   Isolation: 0.6km
ITM: 733966 827609,   GPS IDs, 6 char: SlvBg, 10 char: Slieve Beg
Bedrock type: Granite granophyre, (Mourne Mountains granite)

The most notable feature of Slieve Beg is the scree-run known as the Devil's Coachroad which dissects its eastern flank.   Slieve Beg is the 299th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/
COMMENTS for Slieve Beg 1 2 3 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Slieve Beg and the Devils Coach Road
 
Little mountain, Big attitude
Short Summary created by wicklore,  2 May 2011
Slieve Beg sits at the northern end of a ridge of mountains that separate the Annalong Valley from the joint Silent Valley/Ben Crom Valleys. Slieve Beg (Little Mountain) is well named as it is surrounded to the west, north and east by higher mountains such as Donard, Commedagh, Bearnagh, Cove, Lamagan and Chimney Rock. However what it lacks in stature it more than makes up for in its eastern face, which is made up of sheer cliffs and the infamous Devils Coach Road – a fearsome steep gully that should only be tackled by the very experienced.

One approach is to follow the Bloody Bridge track starting at J389 270 A. Follow the track for about 4 kms up to the Mourne Wall and the Brandy Pad at J353 268 B. Cross the stile at the wall and follow the clear Brandy Pad track NW for about 2kms until it passes over the col between Slieve Beg and Slieve Commedagh. A short walk of a few hundred metres south will bring you to the summit area. Caution is needed as the bog of the summit abruptly plummets away to the east as the cliffs literally start at the summit area. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/5057/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
tsunami on Slieve Beg, 2004
by tsunami  9 Oct 2004
Climbed up here for the first time today. Used the fantastic secure carpark at Meelmore Lodge and went up the Trassey Track to the Hares Gap. Following the Brandy Pad around towards the shoulder between Commedagh and Beg and then took the short hop to the summit. The main reason I was here today was not for a strenuous walk, I would have taken in Lamagan and Cove first if that was my goal - no, today was about curiosity. From reading the other comments here and hearing tales from more experienced walkers I decided that I needed to see the Devils Coachroad for myself. Against better judgement, when those more experienced men told me not to, I was here on my own. "Ah, sure what would they know?!" I told myself. "I'm young, fit(ish), a good geographer and mapreader, and I've been around enough of the Mournes! I'll be grand!" So, I got to the summit of Beg, and began poking around for the Coachroad. The view from the summit of this small mountain is reason enough in itself to come here without this scree run, especially back towards Bearnagh and a goor perspective of Donard and Commedagh. Suddenly there it was, and all those warnings came flooding back. The butterflies rose in my stomach and the palms began to sweat! But what the hell, I took a couple of tentative steps down into the chasm - a stone went from under my right foot, and is probably still rolling - thinking better of it I scrambled back to the top and took a few photos from the safety of solid ground. With the pulse still racing I decided to go down along the river and traverse across to the base of the chasm for another perspective. Grasping handfulsof heather I hauled myself across and made it onto the scree run. Photos cannot do the steepness of this slope any justice, I managed to make it about a third of the way up the chasm but was in no position to take pictures, just take in the awesome view. The picture was taken from across the valley on the Brandy Pad at the base of Donard - I think it says more than i can put into words today! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1225/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
 
Bleck Cra on Slieve Beg, 2004
by Bleck Cra  19 Oct 2004
Coming off Cove, heading manfully towards Commedagh or ‘tother way off the Pad into her dusty skirt tails, you could just about miss her. A couple of steps and you’re on her “summit”. I wandered her three or four times in treacle mist before I learned what you could get yourself into - or downto.
I stood at the top of the Coachroad gully as the mirk cleared and felt my breakfast shift.
Two or three runs later and a parched summer day circa 96 and big shot here instead of respectfully tipping his hat to eternity en passant, took a lep over the lip and down through ghost-like granite and increasing inclines to a world of ripped knees, torns fingers and a terror the temperature of dead meat.
ricky k astutely describes this bat’s nest as “as a quick descent to the valley”.
Like all these idiot circumstances we get ourselves into, it’s the fear that’ll kill us quicker than gravity - although of course, one can lead to the other.
Any thoughts of vistas and such, vanish into each blade-clear crack as it clicks and whispers under your weight.
Suddenly you’re on the valley and the Annalong track - too suddenly is bad. You will look back up and shout “I did that - wow!” and repeat it several times before you shake yourself out of the trauma.
And of course you must do it again - that was 96 and this is 2004.
tsunami’s characteristic and entertaining style of self-effacement in his view of 09.10.04 describes his experience: “thinking better of it I scrambled back to the top and took a few photos from the safety of solid ground” Good man tsunami - hope you got plenty of pics of eedjits plummeting to their vainglorious deaths. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1262/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Looking down the Devils Coach Road - can you see the person below?
wicklore on Slieve Beg, 2009
by wicklore  23 Oct 2009
For a small hill Slieve Beg has a fierce summit. It is simple to reach the summit from the Brandy Pad but the top has sheer drops on its SE side. These sheer drops include the infamous Devils Coach Road. McClimber gave us a most interesting talk about it when a few of us renegades broke off the main Scavenger Walk in August to pass near Slieve Beg. I recently came back to climb Slieve Beg and see the fearsome gully.

Most other photos show the Coach Road from across the bog. Mine was taken from above looking down. I even captured a brave soul on his/her way down, and this gives a good sense of scale. Slieve Beg is not a summit where you could be inattentive as those cliffs would be very unforgiving. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/4221/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
 
ricky k on Slieve Beg, 2004
by ricky k  6 Sep 2004
Slieve beg from chimney rock mtn. the cleft of the devils coach road can be seen directly above the obvious scree chute running from bottom left. a steep but satisfying way up from the upper reaches of the annalong valley. as big phil states, not for novices or those with a fear of loose ground. take care near the top as the rock is very crumbly. can also be used as a quick descent to the valley. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1170/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Slieve Beg in area Mourne Mountains, Ireland
tsunami on Slieve Beg, 2005
by tsunami  11 Jan 2005
Will I? Won't I?............. Standing below the Devils Coachroad - Contemplating................................
Before swiftly moving along to rejoin the Brandy Pad and get back to the car at Meelmore Lodge. Ah well! Nice Idea though! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/297/comment/1419/
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(End of comment section for Slieve Beg.)

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