Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill or mountain

Users Online:
Guests online: 45
Recent Contributions

Torc Mountain W Top: Big brother ....

Barnahowna: Fine-weather photo

Maumtrasna North-East Top: Worth a visit!

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore

Crossderry: Summit No 2 of a fine ridge walk.

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge

Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.

Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn

Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10

Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh

Slieve Foye

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Dublin/Wicklow Area   Wicklow Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 925 metres,   Summits in area: 128,   Maximum prominence for area: 905 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 28B, 49, 50, 55, 56, 61, 62, AWW For all tops   Highest summit: Lugnaquilla, 925m

Summits in area Dublin/Wicklow:
Ballinacorbeg 336mBallinastraw 284mBallycurry 301mBallyguile Hill 188mBallyhook Hill 288mBray Head Hill 240mCarrickgollogan 276mCarrigeen Hill 298mCarrigoona Commons East 242mCloghnagaune 385mCorballis Hill 258mCupidstown Hill 378.6mDunranhill 342mEagle Hill 296mKilleagh 249mKilliney Hill 153.5mKilmichael Hill 267mKilnamanagh Hill 217mKnockannavea 400.8mKnockree 342mMount Kennedy 365.9mSlieveroe 332mWestaston Hill 270m
Dublin Mountains:   Corrig Mountain 617.1mGlendoo Mountain 586mKippure 757mKnocknagun 555mPrince William's Seat 555mSaggart Hill 396.9mSeahan 647.3mSeefin 620.6mSeefingan 722.9mTibradden Mountain 467mTwo Rock Mountain 536m
Wicklow Mountains:   Annagh Hill 454mBallinacor Mountain 531mBallinafunshoge 480mBallineddan Mountain 652mBallycumber Hill 431mBallycurragh Hill 536mBallyteige 447mBaltinglass Hill 382mBarranisky 280mBenleagh 689mBlack Hill 602.2mBrockagh Mountain 557mBrockagh Mountain North-West Top 548mBrockagh Mountain SE Top 470mCamaderry Mountain 698.6mCamaderry South East Top 677.3mCamenabologue 758mCamenabologue SE Top 663mCarrick Mountain 381mCarrickashane Mountain 508mCarrig Mountain 571mCarrigleitrim 408mCarriglineen Mountain 455mCarrignagunneen 561mCarrigshouk 572.5mCarrigvore 682mChurch Mountain 544mCloghernagh 800mCollon Hill 238mConavalla 734mCorriebracks 531mCorrigasleggaun 794mCroaghanmoira 664mCroaghanmoira North Top 575mCroghan Kinsella 606mCroghan Kinsella East Top 561mCullentragh Mountain 510mCushbawn 400mDerrybawn Mountain 474mDjouce 725mDuff Hill 720mFair Mountain 571.2mFananierin 426mGravale 718mGreat Sugar Loaf 501mKanturk 523mKeadeen Mountain 653mKirikee Mountain 474mKnocknacloghoge 534mLakeen 357mLittle Sugar Loaf 342mLobawn 636mLugduff 652mLugduff SE Top 637mLuggala 595mLugnagun 446.2mLugnaquilla 925mMaulin 570mMoanbane 703mMoneyteige North 427mMullacor 657mMullaghcleevaun 849mMullaghcleevaun East Top 790mMuskeagh Hill 397mPreban Hill 389mRobber's Pass Hill 508.9mScarr 641mScarr North-West Top 561mSeskin 344mSilsean 698mSleamaine 430mSlieve Maan 547.8mSlieve Maan North Top 550mSlievecorragh 418mSlievefoore 414mSlievemaan 759mSorrel Hill 599.5mSpinans Hill 409mSpinans Hill SE Top 400mStoney Top 714mStookeen 420mSugarloaf 552mTable Mountain 701.7mTable Mountain West Top 563mTinoran Hill 312mTomaneena 682.4mTonduff 642mTonduff East Top 593mTonelagee 817mTonelagee NE Top 668mTonlagee South-East Top 546mTrooperstown Hill 430mWar Hill 686mWhite Hill 630.9m
Rating graphic.
Tonduff Mountain Tóin Dubh A name in Irish
(Ir. Tóin Dubh [OSI*], 'black bottom') Wicklow County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam Lists, Granite with microcline phenocrysts Bedrock

Height: 642m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 56 Grid Reference: O15944 13685 This summit has been logged as climbed by 482 members. Recently by: IainT, Lauranna, tsheehy, sandilandsn, KevinRoche, strangeweaver, Damien25, lw24, Dbosonnet, inigoalana, a_whelan99, tommyclarke, carofurey, Coles, James-a-walsh
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.267332, Latitude: 53.161294 , Easting: 315944, Northing: 213685 Prominence: 117m,   Isolation: 1.2km
ITM: 715866 713713,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Tonduf, 10 char: Tonduff
Bedrock type: Granite with microcline phenocrysts, (Type 2p microcline porphyritic)

The marking of Tonduff North and Tonduff South as separate hill-names on the Discovery map does not seem justified, as there is only a single peak.   Tonduff is the 210th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/
COMMENTS for Tonduff 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tonduff in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Tonduff
Flat, graceless top positioned for various routes.
Short Summary created by simon3,  28 Feb 2011
While Tonduff is a flat boggy summit it is useful because it can be incorporated into various longer walks. It's east side and the east extending ridge it has towards Maulin are steep when facing north in places.
Two obvious approaches to Tonduff are from the east and the west respectively. From the west park in the Crone Wood carpark O1920 1417 A and walk on forest tracks to O 181 141 Bfrom then up a shoulder SW to the summit.
From the west, start from the nearby R115 for example from Liffey Head Bridge at O137137 C from which it is around 2km over rough ground to the east. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/4966/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tonduff in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Moonrise over Tonduff.
Moonlight visit!
by Dessie1  18 Oct 2011
Parked car at Access road at base of Kippure O1413914164 D (Room for 4-5 cars here).Took a direct course bearing 106 deg toward summit across very wet,boggy and knee high heather filled terrrain(1.9Km). Reached open flat summit (O1594413686 E) after approx 45 mins which was marked by a mere gathering of stones atop some raised bog.Excellent views in all directions of War Hill,Djouce and Maulin to the South and Kippures mast to the NorthWest.Retraced steps back to car in a round trip of approx 1 and a half hrs. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/6586/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
Cormac_L on Tonduff, 2008
by Cormac_L  7 Jul 2008
Word of warning to those using the wall route, along the northern side of the Raven's Glen, to climb Tonduff. As you haul up by the path along the wall, about ten minutes up at a point where there's trees on both sides of the wall, a large, very nasty and very rusty piece of barbed wire has been draped over the wall itself. No big deal usually, except that this is a section where the path runs directly alongside the wall, and only gloves saved me from injuring my hand on it as I went up in wet conditions today.
Tried to pull the wire up and out but failed, next time I'm taking a small cutters. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/3208/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tonduff in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
padodes on Tonduff, 2008
by padodes  5 Jul 2008
Tonduff is usually described as a dull, unexciting top, but a good approach can make amends for that, and the rugged Ravens’ Glen offers at least three of them. (Ravens’ Glen is the name given in the Harvey Map, though not in the OSI, to the little valley that some glacier chewed out of the eastern side of Tonduff. It lies within the square kilometre that has O 170 130 F as its lower left-hand corner.)

The first and easiest route starts just beyond where the forest track from Crone car park (Glencree) passes over the stream issuing from the glen. Crossing the stile to the left (O 181 141), one has only to follow the narrow track along the granite wall on the north side of the valley up to the shoulder at O 175 142 G, before striking out slightly south-westwards, firstly over sharply rising ground and then over bogland, to nearby Tonduff.

Calling for a bit more exertion, a second approach begins on the south side of the glen, across a wet hollow that is accessed from the forest track at O 180 136 H. At the head of the valley here, a clearly visible ramp and gully, usually with a negligible flow of water, leads upwards. Where it narrows at the top, the high vegetation closes in and tends to hamper but not prevent progress.

The third approach is the more challenging. Again, starting at the above-mentioned stile, one follows the ferny meanders of the stream that flows from the Glen, right up to the steep headwall. The photo shows this upper section, with its double waterfall. It is possible to push one’s way up onto the next level through the vegetation on the left-hand side, but just out of the picture, further to the right, the steep, smooth granite shelves down to within a manageable 6 ft of the ground. If you have a companion with you, a leg-up will get you started. If you haven’t, I found that throwing my rucksack onto the rock above, with my wallet inside, gave me all the incentive I needed to get over the obstacle. Once above, the climb continues over very broken ground, with rocky outcrops and thick vegetation but otherwise no insurmountable barrier. From the rim, the remainder of the way to Tonduff, directly west, is a 1 km walk over gently rising heathery ground. I don’t suppose this third approach to Tonduff, and maybe not even the second, will fall within every walker’s comfort zone, but if you’re in search of interesting alternatives and don’t mind roughing it a bit you won’t be disappointed. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/3203/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tonduff in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
simon3 on Tonduff, 2002
by simon3  23 Dec 2002
Tonduff is described on the OSI sheet 56 as being in two parts, Tonduff North and Tonduff South. Both have little visual appeal to the walker, though they are parts of various popular routes. The original name of Tonduff (black backside) adds little allure either. Geographically Tonduff is interesting because the sources of three East coast rivers start on the southern flanks of the mountain: the Liffey, Dargle and Avonmore.
The composite photo was taken during a circuit of the Glencree Valley in December and shows an unusual, carved rock to the east and south of the summit. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/248/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Tonduff in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: A man in search of a summit
padodes on Tonduff, 2010
by padodes  23 Feb 2010
Tonduff wasn’t living up to its dark name last weekend. It was dazzling white under a cloak of hoarfrost and could more aptly have been called Tonbawn or Tonbane.

It’s no easy task to determine a grid reference for the summit point on this broad, flat top. Several peat hags are crowned with cairns and all could equally claim the honour. My own vote, for what it’s worth, goes to O 1594 1368 I (see photo).

The peat hags give an idea of the thickness of blanket bog that once covered this top. It has now disappeared to a great extent, but the process of erosion is not a recent one. Although we often blame quads, bikes and stomping boots for precipitating erosion, that isn’t always the case. Quite frequently we seem to be looking at an extended natural process that has as much to do with patterns of climate change as with human incursions. Perhaps, indeed, in years to come many of our green/brown mountain domes will have a bald pate and will have no need of frost or snow to dazzle us with their brightness. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/206/comment/4434/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
COMMENTS for Tonduff 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Tonduff.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here