Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Overview
Detail
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill or mountain
Videos

Users Online:
Guests online: 50
Recent Contributions

Ben Alder: Culra Bothy is closed due to asbestos problem

Cuilkillew: Another Route.

Lake District: Helvellyn, Up Striding and down Swirral Edges

Knockaglana: Trespecers Beware.

Lake District: Scafell & Scafell Pike

Tonelagee: Unusual view

Kungsleden trail from Saltoluokta to Kvikkjokk

Fei Sheehy Challenge 2016

Lugnaquilla: How's Your Concentration?

Croagh Patrick 10/09/2016

Pic du Midi d'Ossau

Bouleevin: "Smelly Goat Hill"?

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Dublin/Wicklow Area   Dublin Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 925 metres,   Summits in area: 128,   Maximum prominence for area: 905 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 28B, 49, 50, 55, 56, 61, 62, AWW For all tops   Highest summit: Lugnaquilla, 925m

Summits in area Dublin/Wicklow:
Ballinacorbeg 336mBallinastraw 284mBallycurry 301mBallyguile Hill 188mBallyhook Hill 288mBray Head Hill 240mCarrickgollogan 276mCarrigeen Hill 298mCarrigoona Commons East 242mCloghnagaune 385mCorballis Hill 258mCupidstown Hill 378.6mDunranhill 342mEagle Hill 296mKilleagh 249mKilliney Hill 153.5mKilmichael Hill 267mKilnamanagh Hill 217mKnockannavea 400.8mKnockree 342mMount Kennedy 365.9mSlieveroe 332mWestaston Hill 270m
Dublin Mountains:   Corrig Mountain 617.1mGlendoo Mountain 586mKippure 757mKnocknagun 555mPrince William's Seat 555mSaggart Hill 396.9mSeahan 647.3mSeefin 620.6mSeefingan 722.9mTibradden Mountain 467mTwo Rock Mountain 536m
Wicklow Mountains:   Annagh Hill 454mBallinacor Mountain 531mBallinafunshoge 480mBallineddan Mountain 652mBallycumber Hill 431mBallycurragh Hill 536mBallyteige 447mBaltinglass Hill 382mBarranisky 280mBenleagh 689mBlack Hill 602.2mBrockagh Mountain 557mBrockagh Mountain North-West Top 548mBrockagh Mountain SE Top 470mCamaderry Mountain 698.6mCamaderry South East Top 677.3mCamenabologue 758mCamenabologue SE Top 663mCarrick Mountain 381mCarrickashane Mountain 508mCarrig Mountain 571mCarrigleitrim 408mCarriglineen Mountain 455mCarrignagunneen 561mCarrigshouk 572.5mCarrigvore 682mChurch Mountain 544mCloghernagh 800mCollon Hill 238mConavalla 734mCorriebracks 531mCorrigasleggaun 794mCroaghanmoira 664mCroaghanmoira North Top 575mCroghan Kinsella 606mCroghan Kinsella East Top 561mCullentragh Mountain 510mCushbawn 400mDerrybawn Mountain 474mDjouce 725mDuff Hill 720mFair Mountain 571.2mFananierin 426mGravale 718mGreat Sugar Loaf 501mKanturk 523mKeadeen Mountain 653mKirikee Mountain 474mKnocknacloghoge 534mLakeen 357mLittle Sugar Loaf 342mLobawn 636mLugduff 652mLugduff SE Top 637mLuggala 595mLugnagun 446.2mLugnaquilla 925mMaulin 570mMoanbane 703mMoneyteige North 427mMullacor 657mMullaghcleevaun 849mMullaghcleevaun East Top 790mMuskeagh Hill 397mPreban Hill 389mRobber's Pass Hill 508.9mScarr 641mScarr North-West Top 561mSeskin 344mSilsean 698mSleamaine 430mSlieve Maan 547.8mSlieve Maan North Top 550mSlievecorragh 418mSlievefoore 414mSlievemaan 759mSorrel Hill 599.5mSpinans Hill 409mSpinans Hill SE Top 400mStoney Top 714mStookeen 420mSugarloaf 552mTable Mountain 701.7mTable Mountain West Top 563mTinoran Hill 312mTomaneena 682.4mTonduff 642mTonduff East Top 593mTonelagee 817mTonelagee NE Top 668mTonlagee South-East Top 546mTrooperstown Hill 430mWar Hill 686mWhite Hill 630.9m
Rating graphic.
Seahan Mountain Suíochán A name in Irish
(Ir. Suíochán [PWJ*], 'seat' ) Dublin County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam Lists, Dark slate-schist, quartzite & coticule Bedrock

Height: 647.3m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 56 Grid Reference: O08119 19696 This summit has been logged as climbed by 430 members. Recently by: strangeweaver, Murray-Tucker, DeirdreRafter, Damien25, lw24, brayhead, Dbosonnet, tommyclarke, wild_brian, feargalf, inigoalana, tomodub, Pepe, KevinRoche, eoindunlea
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.382208, Latitude: 53.216951 , Easting: 308120, Northing: 219697 Prominence: 93.8m,   Isolation: 1km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 708045 719726,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Seahan, 10 char: Seahan
Bedrock type: Dark slate-schist, quartzite & coticule, (Butter Mountain Formation)

Seahan has two megalithic cairns on its summit. Liam Price noted that Seahan appears on the Down Survey maps as Seavick na bantree and rightly interpreted this as Ir. Suidhe Mhic na Baintrighe, 'seat of the widow's son'. However, he believed that the story behind the name would never be understood: This curious name must have some reference to old traditions about the ancient burial cairns which crown the top of this mountain. All such traditions about this place have long ago disappeared (The Antiquities and Place Names of South County Dublin, Dublin Historical Record, vol. ii, no. 4, 121-33). While the precise story may never be recovered, it should be noted that Mac na Baintrí, the widow's son, is a common figure in Irish folktales whose characteristics are eternal persistence and ingenuity in the face of adversity.   Seahan is the 205th highest summit in Ireland. Seahan is the third highest point in county Dublin.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/200/
COMMENTS for Seahan << Prev page 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
Question for regular climbers of Seehan. I am doi .. by bogboy   (Show all for Seahan)
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Defender or foe of the Mountainviewers?
 
May the (gale) force be with ye!
by mcrtchly  9 Nov 2010
Twenty five years ago I climbed Seahan on a cold winter’s day when the ground was covered in snow and the wind gave an almost arctic feel. The route taken that day was as described in the “Irish Walk Guides – East”. We decided to follow the route again last Sunday (the day of first incoming major storm of the winter). The route starts at the junction of the R114 with the road to Glenasmole at O08193 23076 A where there is a small pull-in suitable for a few cars. The original route passed through a gate on the south side of the junction and steeply up a field. Here we found our first obstacle which was a bracken and bramble covered slope. We declined a tussle with the vegetation and head off towards the SE along the Glenasmole road for about 300m until a forest road is met. This forest road was taken through mature woodland in a SE direction for about 700m to a switch back at O08545 22469 B. Soon after this the forest road peters out and a boundary is encountered with newer forestry to the west. This forestry wasn’t here on my last visit 25 years ago. A small cairn at O08332 22687 C makes an indistinct break in the forestry which leads uphill in a SW direction. Soon the break disappeared and we were forced to fight through the under storey of trees to eventually reach the top of Slievenabawnoge hill (O08068 22569 D). Another break in the trees headed off in a SSE direction to met an area of recent clear felled trees. This presented a new challenge of crossing piles of fallen branches and tree roots left after the felling until another stand of mature forestry was met. Now there was clear path along the side of the forestry heading uphill towards Seahan. Off-road motorbikes had been here before and churned up the path into a muddy wallow all the way to the top.

Our fight to the summit of Seahan by the chosen route was accompanied by increasing winds as the day wore on and the deep frontal depression approached Ireland. The summit of Seahan has a number of burial tombs which we believed to date from Neolithic times. Our assumption of their age was challenged by an ominous presence on the summit trig point – Darth Vader himself!. Resplendent with a glowing red ‘light’ sabre pointing to the north. Is Seahan some form of portal to Tatooine (Darth Vader’s home planet)?. Or perhaps he is warding off hillwalking invaders from the North?. We wait to see what happens in the next sequel/prequel of Star Wars – perhaps the Wicklow Mountains will be the battle ground between the Rebel Alliance (Mountainviewers) and the Empire (Mountaineering I…..).

Following our encounter with Darth Vader (and a quick traverse to Corrig and back) we beat a hasty retreat down back to the car pursued by now near gale force winds (MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU).

PS. I don’t recommend the route we took. A much easier route is now possible from the R114 by taking a forest track along the edge of the Kilbride rifle range at O073200 E as described by Wicklore. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/200/comment/6159/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
In late November 2005, members of Queen's Univ. B .. by pdtempan   (Show all for Seahan)
 
From the pillar on Corrig to Seahan is 0.99km for .. by Geo   (Show all for Seahan)
 
Seahan, viewed from the summit of Seefingan. The .. by csd   (Show all for Seahan)
 
Climbed 10/02/07 as part of Seefingan Circuit, su .. by eflanaga   (Show all for Seahan)
 
(End of comment section for Seahan.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here