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Altnapaste: From a westerly direction

Beara and the Cahas - Captain Vertigo

PMG Walk 12 - Galty Mountains. End to end with a few extras summits.

Kilmacomma Hill: Caisleán na Muice

Slieve Meelmore: Meelmore Highs

PMG Walk 13 - Knockmealdowns Walk

Ott Mountain: A stoney track but a boggy end

Healy Pass to Ardgroom

Slievemoughanmore: Just follow the wall.

PMG Walk 14 - Monabrack to Seefin via Knockeenatoung - Loop Walk

Ballyvouskill: Fine views across the plains of Cork

Knockadullaun: A forest track to within 50 metres of the summit

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Dublin/Wicklow Area   Dublin Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 925 metres,   Summits in area: 111,   Maximum prominence for area: 905 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 28B, 49, 50, 55, 56, 61, 62, Extent1 For all tops   Highest summit: Lugnaquilla, 925m

Summits in area Dublin/Wicklow:
Ballinacorbeg 336mBallinastraw 284mBallycurry 301mBallyguile Hill 188mBallyhook Hill 288mBray Head Hill 240mCarrickgollogan 276mCarrigeen Hill 298mCarrigoona Commons 242mCloghnagaune 385mCorballis Hill 258mCupidstown Hill 379mDunranhill 342mEagle Hill 296mKilleagh 249mKilliney Hill 153mKilmichael Hill 267mKilnamanagh Hill 217mKnockannavea 396mKnockree 342mMount Kennedy 366mSlieveroe 332mWestaston Hill 270m
Dublin Mountains:   Corrig Mountain 617.059mGlendoo Mountain 586mKippure 757mKnocknagun 555mPrince William's Seat 555mSaggart Hill 395mSeahan 647.3mSeefin 620.571mSeefingan 722.896mTibradden Mountain 467mTwo Rock Mountain 536m
Wicklow Mountains:   Annagh Hill 454mBallinacor Mountain 531mBallinafunshoge 480mBallineddan Mountain 652mBallycumber Hill 431mBallycurragh Hill 536mBallyteige 447mBaltinglass Hill 382mBarranisky 280mBenleagh 689mBlack Hill 602.245mBrockagh Mountain 557mBrockagh Mountain SE Top 470mCamaderry Mountain 698mCamenabologue 758mCamenabologue SE Top 663mCarrick Mountain 381mCarrickashane Mountain 508mCarrigleitrim 408mCarriglineen Mountain 455mCarrigshouk 572.501mCarrigvore 682mChurch Mountain 544mCloghernagh 800mCollon Hill 238mConavalla 734mCorriebracks 531mCorrigasleggaun 794mCroaghanmoira 664mCroghan Kinsella 606mCushbawn 400mDerrybawn Mountain 474mDjouce 725mDuff Hill 720mFananierin 426mGravale 718mGreat Sugar Loaf 501mKeadeen Mountain 653mKirikee Mountain 474mKnocknacloghoge 534mLakeen 357mLittle Sugar Loaf 342mLobawn 636mLugduff 652mLugduff SE Top 637mLuggala 595mLugnagun 446mLugnaquilla 925mMaulin 570mMoanbane 703mMoneyteige North 427mMullacor 657mMullaghcleevaun 849mMullaghcleevaun East Top 790mMuskeagh Hill 397mPreban Hill 389mScarr 641mSeskin 344mSilsean 698mSleamaine 430mSlieve Maan 547.819mSlievecorragh 418mSlievefoore 414mSlievemaan 759mSorrel Hill 599.456mSpinans Hill 409mSpinans Hill SE Top 400mStoney Top 714mStookeen 420mTable Mountain 701.683mTinoran Hill 312mTomaneena 681mTonduff 642mTonelagee 817mTonelagee NE Top 668mTrooperstown Hill 430mWar Hill 686m
Rating graphic.
Seahan Mountain Suíochán A name in Irish
(Ir. Suíochán [PWJ*], 'seat' ) Dublin County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam Lists

Height: 647.3m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 56 Grid Reference: O08119 19696 This summit has been logged as climbed by 377 members. Recently by: marcw, murpha26, chalky, oriordanj, Murfireland, gringottsgoblin, ahogan, geohappy, tmcg, newpark-cc, Garmin, fitzsimj, Joe_King, paddyman, RachelW
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.382208, Latitude: 53.216951 Prominence: 93.8m,   Isolation: 1km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 708045 719726,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Seahan, 10 char: Seahan

Seahan has two megalithic cairns on its summit. Liam Price noted that Seahan appears on the Down Survey maps as Seavick na bantree and rightly interpreted this as Ir. Suidhe Mhic na Baintrighe, 'seat of the widow's son'. However, he believed that the story behind the name would never be understood: This curious name must have some reference to old traditions about the ancient burial cairns which crown the top of this mountain. All such traditions about this place have long ago disappeared (The Antiquities and Place Names of South County Dublin, Dublin Historical Record, vol. ii, no. 4, 121-33). While the precise story may never be recovered, it should be noted that Mac na Baintrí, the widow's son, is a common figure in Irish folktales whose characteristics are eternal persistence and ingenuity in the face of adversity.   Seahan is the 200th highest summit in . Seahan is the third highest point in county Dublin.

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Airy views over Kildare from this well positioned peak.
Short Summary created by simon3, wicklore, YoungJohn  6 Nov 2011 Seahan is one of the four hills in the so called ‘Circuit of Kilbride’. Kilbride Rifle Range is an Army range on the Dublin/Wicklow border and it is nestled in a valley surrounded by Seahan, Corrig, Seefingan and Seefin. In fact these summits mark the boundary of the Rifle Range (Although strictly speaking the boundary passes within 150 metres of Seahan’s summit)
A minor road leads from Bohernabreena in Dublin past the entrance to the Range. Seahan can be reached from this road at O073200 (Point A) for example. At about 480 metres altitude this leaves a 160 metres climb to Seahan. There are remains of several megalithic tombs on Seahan. There are also good views towards Dublin and across to Seefingan and Seefin.
Because of the rather featureless nature of these hills it could be easy to become disoriented in poor weather which could mean an unintended descent into the Rifle Range. Seahan itself is generally ok underfoot, but the wider circuit includes some very wet and boggy cols. Also scramblers and quad bikes have churned up the bog in many places.
Point A: O073 200

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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Faraway Hills
 
by padodes  1 Feb 2009 Looking southwards from Seahan, the hazy planes of several hills seem to overlap in the distance: Seefingan, Seefin, Sorrel. In reality, they form, together with Seahan, a wide arc, with Seefingan at 2.67 kms distance, Seefin at 3.52, and Sorrel at 8.70, as the crow flies. They are all linked, too, through the presence of megalithic cairns on each one. The distant mounds are perfectly visible in the photo, at least at full resolution, and are not exactly on the summit of each hill but slightly lower down to the west, facing out across the fertile plain that laps up against the hills of north-west Wicklow, along the borders with Kildare and Dublin.

The picture that archaeology provides of this area gives enormous added interest to walking in these hills. It takes us back to the development of farming in neolithic times, when organised communities cultivated here the lowland fringes of the central plain, yet buried their eminent dead in elaborate hilltop tombs. The similarities in construction and symbolism all point to a common social and religious outlook that one would love to be able to grasp.

As far as the hills themselves are concerned, one thing that leaves me pensive is the fact that, even at that early stage, the human impact on the terrain was already quite notable. From an examination of the pollen record preserved deep in the bog (and one such study was made precisely in the area between Seefin and Seefingan), there is evidence of the prehistoric clearance of trees for pasture and of the later burning of the moorland that replaced the woods. Today we complain of the ugly clear-felling of forest and the recurring summertime ritual of turning the heather to ashes, but, for better or for worse, these are things that have been carried on here in the hills for well over four thousand years!
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Sitting room
by padodes  2 Feb 2009 The name Seahan is said to come from ‘Suíochán’. On the Down Survey map of 1655 and on Rocque’s map of 1760, the mountain is called “Seavick na Bantree”, an anglicisation that suggests the translation ‘Seat (Suí) of the Widow’s Son’. The word “Suí” in one combination or another keeps coming up in other hilltop names in this area as well (Seefin, Seefingan), and it clearly refers in each case to the large megalithic tombs on those mountains. If we remember that the old Fenian Cycle in Irish literature situates some of the heroic feats of Finn MacCool and the Fianna in nearby Glenasmole and the hills around, I think it’s easy to understand how the popular imagination would see in these giant ‘seats’ the haunts of our Celtic supermen. Seefin (Suí Finn), just 3.5 kms to the south of Seahan, makes the association explicit.

There are no less than three megalithic tombs on Seahan. The cairn to the east is a passage tomb, over 21m in diameter, with a kerb of elongated granite stones. On top of the cairn can be seen the capstone (visible in the photo) over the central chamber. The second cairn, now topped with a trig pillar, is almost 24m in diameter and 2m high. It appears never to have been opened. A short distance further west lie the shattered remains of a wedge tomb – a kind of burial that is considered unusual above 300m.

Seahan can easily be included in a circuit that includes Corrig (the only top without a megalithic monument), Seefingan and Seefin. It’s a walk I have recorded as being approximately 12 kms. The route practically follows the boundary line and, indeed, the stumpy granite boundary markers (one of which sits atop the cairn on Seefingan) around the military firing-range of Kilbride and loops back along the stretch of road in front of it. To enjoy this walk, you definitely need either a good dry spell beforehand, or preferably hard frost. Otherwise, be prepared to get an unpleasant sinking feeling along many a stretch.
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
 
Seahan Summit
by Dessie1  25 May 2010 A very quick hike up Seahan starts the first of 4 mountains.Seahan,Corrig mt,Seefin and Seefingan
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Resting in peace
by padodes  9 Mar 2010 The OS sheet only indicates a cairn and megalithic tomb on top of Seahan, but there is also a wedge tomb only a stone’s throw just west of these two. To my mind, it’s the most photogenic of all three, despite the few shattered slabs that remain. It has had perhaps four thousand years of history wash over it and still resists. It has seen off the heroic huntsmen of the Fianna who allegedly roamed these hills and will see off too the mud-bespattered bikers who now rake up the earth around it. If you are looking for a little taste of timelessness, why not nestle down in the tomb and think yourself back into the mysterious world of the Neolithic chieftain who was once laid in it? Maybe the whisper you hear will not only be the rustle of the wind in the heather… Well, it’s just a suggestion.

Normally such tombs were not built above 300m, but this one lies at twice that height. Considering the many other tombs that bedeck all of these hills, one might sometimes feel like being in a necropolis here. In the photo, you can see Seefingan on the left, with its cairn, and Seefin on the right, with its impressive passage grave. Those living in the plains below could never have felt that their dead were far away.

In the photo you can also make out in the distance the snowy top of Mullaghcleevaun, with its north-facing corrie.
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Seahan in area Dublin/Wicklow, Ireland
Picture: Seahan summit cairn
 
by Harry Goodman  5 Apr 2010 As I was in Dubin over the week-end I decided on Sat 6 Mar 2010 to tackle two of the 600m mountains in Dublin/Wicklow that I had not yet climbed, Seahan and Corrig Mountain. I followed the R114 towards Brittas and at the top of the incline at approx O 0750022800 (Point B) turned left onto the L7462. As I did not have this reference before setting out I had some difficulty in locating this side road. I therefore give above directions for those who, like myself, are not regular walkers in the area. The start point for my walk was a forestry track some 3k along this side road, on the left at O 073520100 (Point C) with parking for several cars. The track was covered in snow and ice and undulated along to a T junction O 0825021050 (Point D) at a less well defined path where I turned right, steeply uphill, for a short walk to a fence and open hillside. From here I turned right along the track following the forest edge and made for Ballymorefin Hill, a "bump" on the way to Seahan. I was suprised to find the track was fence deep in snow and sought to make easier progress by moving across to more open ground on the hillside with less snow cover. There were constant views SE to Corrig as I climbed. At a point where the fence and forest edge swung to the right I continued SE to the cairned top of Seahan. The views south were dominated by Kippure and Seefingan, while Dublin and the lower hills above it were to the NE. From here it had been my plan to walk out and back to Corrig Mountain and then descend to the road by the forest edge and back to the start. However given the fine conditions on the day I decided, when I reached Corrig Mountain, to continue on and complete the full Circuit of Kilbride with walks over Seefingan and Seefin, two tops that I had previously climbed.
Point B: O07500 22800 Point C: N7352 0100 Point D: O08250 21050
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(End of comment section for Seahan.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here