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Cuilcagh 665m, Benbeg 539m,
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Breifne Area   Cuilcagh Mountains Subarea
Maximum height for area: 665 metres,   Summits in area: 14,   Maximum prominence for area: 570 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 26, 27, 27A For all tops   Highest summit: Cuilcagh, 665m
Rating graphic.
Cuilcagh Mountain Binn Chuilceach A name in Irish
(Ir. Binn Chuilceach [DUPN], 'chalky peak') County Highpoint of Cavan & Fermanagh, in County Highpoint, Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Cyclothemic sandstone, siltstone, coal Bedrock

Height: 665m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 26 Grid Reference: H12356 28017 This summit has been logged as climbed by 314 members. Recently by: eejaymm, paulmcquaid, Helenha, danifergie87, doopa, Franky, IainT, Lauranna, Turlo143, 21yearsgone, declanohagan, Wildcat, Reeks2011, peter1, lw24
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -7.811444, Latitude: 54.200972 , Easting: 212356, Northing: 328017 Prominence: 570m,   Isolation: 2.6km,   Has trig pillar
ITM: 612302 828022,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Clcgh, 10 char: Cuilcagh
Bedrock type: Cyclothemic sandstone, siltstone, coal, (Lackagh Sandstone Formation)

Cuilcagh lies on the Shannon-Erne watershed. The Shannon rises on the north-western slopes of Cuilcagh at Shannon Pot, a steep-sided pool where the underground river emerges. Strictly speaking, there are streams a mile or two further uphill. Originating in Ulster, the Shannon’s journey through this province lasts less than ten miles, before it enters Connacht. It forms the boundary between Connacht and Leinster for much of its length, and ultimately meets the sea in the province of Munster. Thus it is both a boundary and a link between all four provinces of Ireland. In fact, it even formed the western boundary of the ancient fifth province of Meath. Around Cuilcagh there is a belief concerning the ‘Northern Shannon’, an underground river that supposedly connects the waters at Shannon Pot to the River Claddagh, which emerges at Marble Arch Caves and then flows into the Erne. If Cuilceach genuinely is a variant of cailceach, 'chalky', the name is rather puzzling, as the mountain consists predominantly of sandstone and shale, covered with much bog and heather. Where the rock does outcrop, as at the summit cliffs, it is mainly grey. However, it is possible that the name refers to the limestone rock on the lower northern flanks. Here a number of streams disappear below ground at swallow holes named Cats Hole, Pollawaddy, Pollasumera and Polliniska, all forming part of the Marble Arch cave system. If so, the name would mean 'calcareous' rather than 'chalky'.   Cuilcagh is the highest mountain in the Breifne area and the 170th highest in Ireland. Cuilcagh is the highest point in county Cavan and also the highest in Fermanagh.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/
COMMENTS for Cuilcagh << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next page >>
On 3 June, my wife and I hiked up Cuillcagh using .. by Alaskan   (Show all for Cuilcagh)
 
Took the most straightforward route to the top fr .. by murphysw   (Show all for Cuilcagh)
 
Braving the landslide! .. by AdrianneB   (Show all for Cuilcagh)
 
Any guide book or description of Cuilcagh I've se .. by madfrankie   (Show all for Cuilcagh)
 
Ascent from Bellavally Gap .. by bsheils   (Show all for Cuilcagh)
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Cuilcagh in area Breifne, Ireland
Picture: Trig
 
Wonderful Wilderness approached from the South
by concorde  29 Mar 2014
A fine spring morning in march and I finally got the chance to climb Cuilcagh an hours drive from my base in Sligo. I chose the excellent route from the south starting at Bellavally Gap as suggested by Doneig supported with a good set of GPS coordinates. It was a short pull up to the non descript summit of Benbeg from where the vista of the route ahead opened up, a sweeping escarpment arcing around to a Cuilcagh peak. This really is a vast wilderness area with the bog stretching nearly 6km east to Swanlinbar. It is best to stick to the rough track that follows the edge of the escarpment down to a damp coll halfway to the summit. Do take care on this route as there were a couple of areas of significant subsidence. If you veer too far inland to the west you will encounter heavier going and have to navigate through a forest of peat hags. From the col the ground rises gently and dries out as you reach the rock strewn summit plateau.
A squally hail shower greeted me as I reached the summit which sported a thin crust of snow.
I took shelter in a small stone enclosure beside the Trig point. The area betrayed the signs of significant human traffic with many bootprints and the discarded debris of some ignorant buffoons There were crisp and chocolate wrappers as well as drinks bottles and paper cups stuffed into the cracks.
Having packed up the discarded debris I retraced my route leaving the summit of Tiltinbane for another day when tackling Cuilcagh from the Northern route. The return trip was notable in that one gets a great view of the interesting North East summit of BenBrack and the sun ignited surface of the high mountain lake Derrynananta. Having reached Benbeg it was a short descent to the start point. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/165/comment/15952/
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(End of comment section for Cuilcagh.)

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British summit data courtesy:
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here
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