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Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore

Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.

Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge

Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10

Crossderry: Summit looking East.

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn

Stumpa Dúloigh SE Top: Fine views to the East...

Knocknabreeda: View of Carrauntoohil from the summit.

Quad bikers in the Mournes

Slieve Foye

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An Corrán Mountain Finnararagh A name in English
(Ir. An Corrán [TH], 'the crescent' or 'the sickle') Kerry County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Best Hundred, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, Green sandstone & siltstone Bedrock

Height: 667m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 78 Grid Reference: V69672 73730 This summit has been logged as climbed by 84 members. Recently by: IainT, thomas_g, jimgraham, millsd1, liz50, Geo, melohara, t.jay, gallybander, oldsoldier, FiachDubh, GSheehy, sandilandsn, Rob_Lee, chalky
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.894226, Latitude: 51.901024 , Easting: 69672, Northing: 73730 Prominence: 142m,   Isolation: 0.8km
ITM: 469650 573792,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Fnrrgh, 10 char: Finararagh
Bedrock type: Green sandstone & siltstone, (St. Finans Sandstone Formation)

Finnararagh is a corruption of Finnavogagh, the name of an area of rough pasture on the plateau W of this peak. The name is correctly recorded in the Ordnance Survey Name Book, but was misspelt when transferred to the map. The peak itself is locally called An Corrán, which aptly describes its crescent-shaped cliffs that dominate Lough Coomeen.   An Corrán is the 165th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/
COMMENTS for An Corrán 1 2 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: The summit from the west.
Dramatic cliffs, bogs and rough ground surround this peak.
Short Summary created by simon3,  26 Apr 2011
There is dramatic ground all around Finnararagh/ An Corrán however the top is fairly tame and there are fairly easy ways up provided you are careful.
From the south you can possibly start on the track leading off the public road at V69259 71239 A. Ask permission at the house there. The track (it's the west of two shown leading from Fermoyle) has a stony surface until you reach the Small River. Head NE for the top. If you veer right you will avoid steeper ground with its cliffs.
From the north one way is to park near Cloon Lough at V 708 788 B. Walk up to Coomura then round the River Deecagh valley going past V 688 737 C and up to the summit.
Attractions include the 310m cliffs down to Lough Coomeen to the east and fine views over the Kenmare river. There's a narrow challenging ridge NE towards Sallagh and eventually towards Mullaghanattin. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/4920/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: View from An Corrán on the Cloon Horseshoe walk
A Cloon View
by kernowclimber  5 Aug 2014
An Corrán lies on the Cloon Horseshoe walk in the wild and unspoilt Dunkerron Mountains which offer arguably some of the finest scenery in Ireland. This panorama was shot near its summit as the sun was sinking low in the western horizon. Macgillycuddy's Reeks can be seen in the background; the summits of Beann and Sallagh in the foreground; Cloon Lough and the Slieve Mish Mountains and Dingle Bay on the far left horizon. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/17595/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Lakes on Finnararagh
johnvbrennan on An Corrán, 2005
by johnvbrennan  18 Apr 2005
I highly recommend Finnararagh. It's not as climbed as the more popular mountains in Kerry like Carrauntuohill and Brandon. I would say this is mainly down to the fact that It's a good 30 minutes drive beyond Killarney. That said on a clear day it offers spectacular 360 degree views. You can see Brandon, Carrauntuohill/Cahir and of course Mullaghanattin.

Finnararagh has some amazing lakes that are nestled into the mountain. Make sure you have a good summers day for this one as it's the only way to really appreciate the scenery. Unfortunately I didn't have my camera on the day with the sunny weather but hopefully the photo will give you some idea of how nice it can be.`

Getting There:

From Killarney, take the road for Glencar. Go past Glencar post office, turn left at Bealalaw Bridge. Park your car at Cloon Lough (V 708 788)

Description of walk:

Head in the track on the northern side of Cloon Lough.

1 Make your way for spot height 532m (V 682 758 D).

2 Next go to 666m (V 677 753 E).

3. Next make for spot height 598m (V 688 737).

4. Spot Height 667m (V 696 737 F)

5. Your now on the ridge at this point. Follow the ridge in a north easterly direction to spot height 543m to 570m to 551m to 619m on V 710 754 G. (Warning steep ridge at both sides from 543m on)

6. Turn east to spot height 636m (V 714 755 H) heading for Mullaghanattin. Continue the ridge to 657m. Then drop down steeply (be vigilant here, steep ground that would be dangerous in foggy conditions) and climb sharply up to 752m (V 726 765 I). There is fence that runs all the way to the top of the mountain.

7. After 752m continue on the ridge for approx 1/3 km to meet the spur going down in a north westerly direction to join the road beside Cloon Lough. This road will bring you back to your car. Be careful coming down the spur as this ground is quite steep in places. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/1653/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Nestled Lakes
johnvbrennan on An Corrán, 2005
by johnvbrennan  18 Apr 2005
Just had to add this photo of some unusual lakes on Finnararagh. The photo doesn't do them justice. Note: there are actually 2 lakes in the photo (spot the other one just beneath the main lake) Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/1654/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Exposed anticline W of Finnararagh.
Risen arches.
by simon3  26 Apr 2011
Striding along the scarp from Coomnacronia to An Corrán gives dramatic views to the south, however spare a thought for the geology visible also.
This arch in the rock (an anticline) is a sign of the huge folding pressures that must have been here once. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/6315/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain An Corrán in area Dunkerron Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Finnararagh
eric on An Corrán, 2005
by eric  16 Dec 2005
After a few dry days in summer a great climb is a direct climb up the eastern face of Finnararagh (In Picture) Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/160/comment/2089/
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British summit data courtesy:
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here