Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Overview
Detail
Zoom: ??
For more map options click on any mountain area or any detail feature.
Detail Map Features
Find Suggested Walks
Find hill, mountain, island, coastal feature.
Videos

Users Online:
majestic0110, markmjcampion, antoin, hdg
Guests online: 141
Recent Contributions

Object to very high windfarm in Sperrins?

Corranabinnia Horseshoe

Near Glendoo Mountain, Dublin/Wicklow (Ireland)

Crazy Hounds

Curra Hill: Cloudy Climb

Cnoc Lios Uachtair: Connemara in the round

Glendalough Larger Loop

Cnoc Mordáin: Long Connemara Summer Evening

Ballinacorbeg: Worth a brief visit

Day 21 Germany Trip

Ballinafunshoge: Eastern View

Day 19 Germany Trip

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
General information about the site is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information in comments, walks or shared GPS tracks may not be accurate for example as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk see conditions.
Credits and list definitions are listed here Credits
Video display
Rating graphic.
Croaghaun Mountain Achill Island Island Cruachán A name in Irish
(Ir. Cruachán [logainm.ie], 'little stack') Mayo County, in Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Best Hundred, Irish Highest Hundred Lists, X-bedded psammites and schists Bedrock

Reachable "On Foot " Y
Height: 688m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 22/30 Grid Reference: F55961 06091 This place has been logged as visited by 235 members. Recently by: PaulNolan, pwbellarby, tommyclarke, sj-byrne, AndrewH, peter1, DavidWalsh, TommyV, livelife2thefull, Geo, Reeks2011, oldpragmatist, IainT, Lauranna, 21yearsgone
I have visited this place: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -10.196559, Latitude: 53.984075 , Easting: 55961, Northing: 306091 Prominence: 688m,  Isolation: 0.7km
ITM: 455940 806102,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Crghn, 10 char: Croaghaun
Bedrock type: X-bedded psammites and schists, (Croaghaun Formation)

It was the tradition for local children to pick berries on the mountain on the last Sunday of July, known locally as Garlic Sunday (apparently a corruption of 'garland') (MacNeill, 191). Walks: for a cliff-top walk near Achill Head, see Siúlóidí Acla, walk A. Previously Tonacroaghaun in MV.   Croaghaun is the highest mountain in the Achill/Corraun area and the 131st highest in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/?PHPSESSID=7icuiaauuqioq9jeie805qfpp5
COMMENTS for Croaghaun 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Evening view of Croaghaun from Minaun
 
sheer beauty
Short Summary created by scapania,  28 Oct 2010
Park at the end of the road at beautiful Keem strand (F560 042 A) and head straight up the steep slope to the west to the cliff edge. Follow the cliff edge along for about a kilometre to around spot height 280m, enjoying the views. From here, if you have a good head for heights and plenty of time, a detour can be made out to rugged Achill head to the west.

Otherwise, head down to the broad col with Croaghaun and very steeply up heathery slopes to reach the southwest top, from where the ground opens up in front of you to reveal the ocean far below. Its then a short walk along the cliff top to the summit. In clear weather, its worthwhile following the ridge over to point 574m for the views. One route back to Keem is to follow the broad ridge that leads southeast from the summit to point 474m and then descend steeply back down to Keem. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/4887/
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Saddle Head from the cliffs west of Croaghaun
Croaghaun from Keem Strand via Benmore Cliffs
by kernowclimber  14 Apr 2010
Croaghaun, a giant slumbering on the western end of Achill Island is not a mountain to be taken lightly. Indeed, everything in this remote part of Ireland seems to be on an epic scale: the cliffs, mountains and views. We parked at Keem Strand above a pristine golden crescent of sand hemmed in by steep cliffs and washed by azure waters, thought to be the location of the artist Paul Henry’s 1910 painting ‘Launching the Currach’. Climbing NW up a steep track to gain the cliff pathway near Carrickfaada, we spotted some violets shyly hiding amid tussocks of grass and the weather beaten shells of several ruined cottages nestled in the valley below, the faint ridges of lazy beds surrounding them speaking eloquently of the industriousness of the inhabitants that once coaxed a living from this land.

On the cliff path we turned north and paused to devour our sandwiches on the edge of land tilting steeply upwards like the prow of a battle ship relentlessly pounded by the restless Atlantic into vertiginous cliffs, savouring the smell of the briny breeze and the sound of waves booming into hidden zawns far below. Beyond Moyteoge Head with its abandoned coastguard watch-house lay Clare Island floating somewhere between sea and sky as if in a mirage, the distinctive shape of Knockmore just visible in the haze. Meandering on the path that rose and fell steeply above Benmore Cliffs we were finally treated to the sight of Achill Head, a crooked finger of land stretching defiantly out into the Atlantic Ocean for over a mile, ending with the sea stacks Gaoí Saggart and Carrickakin.

At F54624 05171 B we descended north of two lakes crossing the bog at the valley bottom to climb the steep stone and heather clad eastern slopes of Croaghaun. In the mid-afternoon heat and high humidity this proved to be an ordeal enlivened only by the fascinating geology of Dalradian quartzites and schists formed around 600 million years ago, many rocks sporting amazing patterns left behind by myriad lichens in shades of ochre, beige and burnt sienna. Walking over rocks resembling a decorative pathway studded with quartz pebbles that are 2 billion years old, swept down in an ancient deluge onto a floodplain from a mountain range in the former continent of Laurentia, gently reminds one of the fleetingness of human life when set against the immensity of geological time.

After a punishing ascent we reached Croaghaun SW Top, a pyramidal giant sliced away by glaciers on its seaward side during the last Ice Age. Great care must be exercised on the walk from here to Croaghaun as enormous slabs of sloping rock form terrifying cliffs some 668m above the turbulent ocean, where one slip would spell instant death. From the summit of Croaghaun are magnificent views east towards Saddle Head, Blacksod Bay and Slievemore and south towards Dooega Head. We then descended steep ground heading SSE meeting the road at F56446 04628 C above Keem Strand, completing our 9km walk in about 5 hours. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/4617/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Lough Bunnafreva West
 
gerrym on Croaghaun, 2007
by gerrym  28 Aug 2007
I reached the summit from the beautiful carpark at Keem, climbing to the jagged cliffs stretching to Achill Head before dropping steeply and ascending even more steeply to the SW top (see for more detail). From the SW top of Croaghaun it is a short drop and curving reascent above the steep cliffs below to reach the summit cairn. I had no view in the mist, but peering down over the cliff edge I had fleeting glimpses of water impossibly far below. I dropped down following the cliff edge, a gust of wind lifted me of my feet and made me run about 30 ft downhill, did I s**t bricks - yes! Views out to Saddle Head appeared as i dropped. There are a couple of gullies which need to be aware of if staying close to the cliff edge as are separated from the main ground. The undoubted highlight of the walk is when Lough Bunnafreva West appears, an impossibly suspended corrielough with plunging cliffs eating ever closer. I got a glimpse of Lough Nakeeroge even further down near sea level. From here i headed S and dropped down steeply beside Lough Acorrymore towards Lough Corryntawy, where a large group of young people where camped. There is an impressive double corrie here, the higher having no lough. Follow road servicing the loughback to the main road and from there the road to Keem (4 km). It is when walking along this raod that the unhindered drops down into the ocean are very apparent, made me more thoughtful on the pull up the hill out of Keem in the car.
Fantastic days walking along with Croaghaun, even with the wind - has just about everything - ocean, loughs, streams, cliffs, stunning views and not many other people about on the day i climbed. Having returned to visit Slieve League recently I am in two minds as to which is the more impressive - it is close but i think that here just loses out by a proverbial whisker! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/2186/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: Croaghaun from Lough Acorrymore. The summit can be reached via the hollow behind the lake.
pdtempan on Croaghaun, 2007
by pdtempan  28 Aug 2007
We climbed Croaghaun from Dooagh taking the road up to Lough Acorrymore. Skirting the lake to south, we picked up a track which leads into the bowl above it. The track disappeared, but the going was good underfoot and we were able to reach the summit in 2¾ hrs. All approaches to Croaghaun are inevitably steep, but this is one of the easiest routes available with plenty of interest on the way up. We had spectacular views of Keel Bay, Minaun Cliffs and Slievemore on the way up. Further afield, the view took in Croagh Patrick, Mweelrea and many islands, including Clare Island, Inishturk and Inishbofin. The mist foiled us at the summit, though, and we only got glimpses of the cliffs north of Croaghaun. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/2806/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
 
darrenf on Croaghaun, 2010
by darrenf  15 Mar 2010
A taste of the breathtaking views on offer along the ridge from Croughaun to spot height 574..... Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/4503/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Croaghaun in area Achill/Corraun, Ireland
Picture: On the shores of Bunafreva Lough West
From the north
by lennyantonelli  31 Aug 2012
Haven't seen this route described on MV previously so here goes — to my mind it beats both the ascent from Lough Accorymore and from the Keem Valley. Being car-less, on Tuesday we walked the bog road from Dooagh towards the deserted village under Slievemore, taking a track heading west at an old mine up onto the hillside and up to the old signal tower west of Slievemore at 194m. We carried on west to the next spot height of 2?2m (the middle digit is worn out on my map), before starting the descent down to Annagh Strand and Lough Nakerooge.

The landscape shifted dramatically here. on the south side the hills here were bog, but on the steep descent to Annagh we had to fight our way through thick ferns and heather, and the huge bulk of Croghaun shielded us from the westerlies. This was my first time at Annagh — for those who have only seen it from the ridge above, the descent to this remote beach and lake is a must. I was tempted to take a dip in the sea, but with rain and strong winds forecast, thought I'd better stay dry for as long as possible.

We carried on west to Bunafreva Lough East and then to the second lake named Lough Nakerooge, which is almost as impressive as the first. I've long thought about spending a night or two camping in this part of Achill and the grassy, sheltered (in westerly winds) land around here would be a perfect place to make camp. This felt like one of the remotest spots I've visited in Ireland, second only to the Nephin Begs (though I'm still a novice when it comes to Kerry and Donegal).

We carried on out to Saddle Head, and having struggled to get a real sense of Croghaun from the Keem Valley before, I was floored by the expansive view here, taking in almost the full breadth of these giant cliffs. We followed a ridge up and south, which led us right into the amphitheatre of Bunafreva Lough West (318m). Having only seen it from above before, standing here was quite the treat. Robert Lloyd Praeger described this route (though in the reverse direction) as "one of the most exhilarating walks in Ireland", and said Bunafreva Lough West was "a place so lonely and sterile and primeval that one might expect to the see piast or other Irish water monster rising from the inky depths of the tarn".

We scrambled up the corrie wall on the south east side of the lake — a slippy, steep ascent to the summit plateau of Croghaun at around 480m. We opted against heading to the summit — the skies were darkening, the peak was covered in cloud and my ankle was starting to niggle  — so we made our way down to the car park at Lough Accorymore. Croghaun always gives you panoramic views of weather systems moving in from the Atlantic, and we could see see a huge wall of rain approaching from the south west. Before long it was on top of us, and as our attempts to hitch back to Keel failed, we walked the last few miles to our hostel in the pouring rain. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/127/comment/14786/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
COMMENTS for Croaghaun 1 2 3 4 Next page >>
(End of comment section for Croaghaun.)

OSi logo OSNI/LPS logo
British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
(Creative Commons Licence)
"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here
MountainViews.ie Hill-walking Website for the island of Ireland. 11 Million Visitors Per Year. 1200 Contributors.