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Hill of Slane 160.4m,
3064, 1km
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East Coast Area
Maximum height for area: 251 metres,   Summits in area: 6,   Maximum prominence for area: 176 metres, OSI/LPS Maps: 35, 36, 42, 43, 50 For all tops   Highest summit: Mount Oriel, 251m
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Hill of Slane Hill Mullach Bhaile Shlaine A name in Irish
Meath County, in Local/Historical/Cultural List, Massive lapilli tuff Bedrock

Height: 160.4m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 43 Grid Reference: N96037 75121 This summit has been logged as climbed by 44 members. Recently by: moggy40t, cozmo2009, Glanman2, pearnett, Niamhq, bryanjbarry, AntrimRambler, Cormacg, paulocon, rowanofravara, Aidy, conormcbandon, wicklore, GoldCircle, Garmin
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.546106, Latitude: 53.717087 , Easting: 296037, Northing: 275122 Prominence: 53m,   Isolation: 8.4km
ITM: 695965 775138,   GPS IDs, 6 char: HlofSl, 10 char: HlofSln
Bedrock type: Massive lapilli tuff, (Hill Of Slane Formation)

The most renowned story with this hill relates to St Patrick and his lighting of a Paschal fire here, in defiance of High King Laoire, who forbid the lighting of any other fires, while a festival fire was burning on the Hill of Tara. This tradition is carried on to this day, each Easter Saturday. The top of the hill is dominated by Christian buildings, with the ruins of an early 16th century friary, a church and graveyard. Monastic life on the hill is traced back to the fifth century. The high point of the hill is the top of the 12th century motte which lies to the west of the ruins.   Hill of Slane is the 1443th highest summit in Ireland. Hill of Slane is the second most northerly summit and also the second most westerly in the East Coast area. Hill of Slane is the third highest point in county Meath.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/
COMMENTS for Hill of Slane 1 of 1
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Hill of Slane in area East Coast, Ireland
Picture: The Summit as viewed from the Abbey
An interesting historic site.
Short Summary created by simon3, jackill,  28 Apr 2014
Park in the public carpark at N96420 75180 A, room for 20 plus cars.
Go through the access gate and uphill for a short distance to the abbey ruins.
Beyond the ruins lies the summit which is on top of a motte, thought to be possibly much older than others of Anglo-Norman vintage.
The motte is quite steep and surrounded by a deep dyke.On top the motte as of 2014 someone has cast a concrete cross with the legend "2011 Japan " made out in pebbles.
Though the Abbey is a public site maintained by the OPW, the motte is on private land and permission may be required to visit. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/comment/15304/
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Hill of Slane in area East Coast, Ireland
Little Hunk of Burning Love
by Trailtrekker  31 Jan 2014
Slane won't attract the column inches on here that it's fellow Meath hills of Tara or Loughcrew will, but for me it has a great charm and in some ways I far prefer visiting it than it's more famous big brother! It's great for a cold evening walk or a summer day outing with the kids.

Most of the summit area is easily accessible. There is ample car parking nearby and from here you can explore the Christian buildings and graveyard. The 16th century friary building is the most interesting and children (big and small) will love exploring it. The most legendary story about Slane is that St Pat himself lit a paschal fire here in defiance of the high king on Tara, a tradition that is kept up till this day on Easter Saturday. However, you will need to go past all the buildings to reach the true top. The highest point (or certainly for several hundred years) is the well preserved 12th century motte. You need to negotiate two electric fences and two gates to reach this point, as it is on the private land of the Conyngham estate. Now you can rock up to his nearby castle and ask Henry for permission if you want, but as far as I am aware he has no major problem with access. (Note: he actually resides in Beauparc house on the other side of the Boyne and not the well known castle).

Personally, I enjoy parking all the way down at the river Boyne and enjoying the walk the whole way up the hill through the historic village and it's architecture. This will give you height gain of 120 metres and cover a distance of over 2km river to motte.

It's a great wee historic hill and if you are passing through Slane on the N2 at night keep an eye out for it's light's that burn to this day and can be seen from a couple of miles south of the river! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/comment/15819/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Hill of Slane in area East Coast, Ireland
Picture: Summit on the hidden motte, secondary enclosure to bottom left.
The summit may be older than is at first apparent.
by simon3  28 Apr 2014
The summit motte and surrounding bailey has been the subject of research recently, for example:


It appears that the motte may not be the common or garden Anglo-Norman motte and bailey, but may be older, Iron Age (400-600 CE) or even Bronze Age (2500 to 600 BCE).

If you are visiting, look out for a smaller, secondary enclosure to the SE of the Motte and summit, just touching the enclosure around the bailey. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/comment/16046/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Hill of Slane in area East Coast, Ireland
Picture: A close view of the Summit
Curious hill
by Onzy  8 Feb 2014
Just a picture. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/comment/15838/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Hill of Slane in area East Coast, Ireland
Picture: Ancient stonework ?
Twinned with Japan
by eamonoc  13 Feb 2014
Wed 12th Feb, in the middle of the motte on the Hill of Slane, I spotted this curiosity. Can anyone enlighten me as to its origin. Is Slane twinned with Japan? Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1060/comment/15854/
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(End of comment section for Hill of Slane.)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here