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Gortmonly Hill 218m,
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Gortmonly Hill Hill Tyrone County, in Binnion List, Psammite & semipellite Bedrock

Height: 218m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 7 Grid Reference: C39639 07923 This summit has been logged as climbed by 15 members. Recently by: eejaymm, sandman, jimmyread, Aidy, chalky, FilHil, Garmin, AntrimRambler, cerosti, Peter Walker, NICKY, mark-rdc, Harry Goodman, ahendroff, three5four0
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -7.382662, Latitude: 54.917355 , Easting: 239639, Northing: 407923 Prominence: 170m,   Isolation: 5.5km
ITM: 639579 907910,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Grt218, 10 char: GrtmnlyHil
Bedrock type: Psammite & semipellite, (Claudy Formation)

Gortmonly is a townland in Donaghedy parish. Gortmonly Hill is also known as Dullerton Mountain or Sollus, names derived from other townlands on its slopes. No Irish name is now known for it, but it is possible that the one or both of the names Dowletter mountayne and Mullaghnegerry, which occur in the Civil Survey of ca. 1655, refer to this hill.   Gortmonly Hill is the 1352th highest summit in Ireland.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1027/
COMMENTS for Gortmonly Hill 1 of 1
three5four0 on Gortmonly Hill, 2009
by three5four0  23 Aug 2009
From the minor road to Craigtown follow the substantial cement track at 400075 A uphill (locked gate where it meets the road). As the track climbs up hill it turns left and starts to level off and you pass the summit on your right, before shortly coming to a couple of gates. The summit area is all fields, there is no open ground here at all, so observe the countryside code and go through the gate on your right and walk the short distance to the summit & return the same way. There was livestock in all the fields here, so make sure you close any gates you open.

There is a small area where you can park just off the minor road, NNE from its junction with the cement track, just passed a house on your left on the way to Craigtown. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1027/comment/4036/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Gortmonly Hill in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Guardian of Gortmonly Hill, Slievekirk in background
 
Climb it if you must!
by Harry Goodman  19 Aug 2010
I climbed this hill on Wed 11 Aug 2010 by the same access track as that identified by three5four0 parking at, but not blocking the entrance C4003507522 B. I followed the cement path steeply up hill and when it turned sharply to the left continued on up to the crest where cement changed to gravel. At this point I turned right, crossed the fence and walked out the short distance to the hill top marked by a high wooden pole C3965007921 C. Just beside the pole was a large flat concrete area probably once a base for a farm shelterbut now long gone.The pole in my view is as good a point to mark the top as any other part of the flat top to this hill. However a quick stomp around for anyone so inclined will ensure crossing the highest point! The top can be reached up and down in 30 minutes. Just NW of the top a little lower down is a group of large boulders which may have some ancient origin. From the top, for a little variety, I dropped down the field along the fence line to a gate before crossing over and re-joining the cement path back down to the start. Gortmonly Hill, Slievekirk and Clondermot Hill can all be climbed in a morning or afternoon with only short driving distances between. For links see my comments on each of the other hills. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1027/comment/6033/
Your Score: Very useful <<  >>Average
 
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Gortmonly Hill in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Slievekirk Under Stormy Skies
Electrifying Experience
by Aidy  29 Jan 2015
Having already been up Curraghchosaly, I planned to do a few more smaller hills in West Tyrone and Derry, starting here. Walked up the concrete road described in the other comments, in snow, hail and strong winds. There was a shooting party, after woodcock, on the side of the hill, but they assured me I would neither be interfering with their pursuits, nor be in danger of being shot! Great views at the top towards Slievekirk, and down over the Foyle. Just as I was about to leave, a really bad storm came in, with horizontal hail and vicious wind. it got incredibly dark, but suddenly everything lit up blue with a flash of lightning and a simultaneous thunderclap. The strike must have been very close, and in such an exposed spot, I was very lucky. I wouldn't have thought it was possible to get down an ice and snow covered concrete road so quickly, but it turns out it is! I also decided that was enough hills for one day. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/1027/comment/17821/
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(End of comment section for Gortmonly Hill.)

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British summit data courtesy:
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