Welcome to MountainViews
Find information for Irish hillwalking. Shared tracks, summit information etc.
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.
Map of Route and Summits (clickable) + - (Map Zoom)

Conditions and Info
Use of MountainViews is governed by conditions.
Hillwalking is a risk sport. Information about the site and about safety is here.
Opinions in material here are not necessarily endorsed by MountainViews.
Information in comments, walks or GPS tracks may not be accurate as regards safety or access permission. You are responsible for your safety and your permission to walk. More.
Recent Items   RSS Feed for Recent Items.
MV Facebook page.   Visit our Facebook page.
Shannon Area Printable format
Maximum height for area: 694 metres Summits in area: 53
OS Map(s): 52, 53, 54, 58, 59, 60, 65, 66 for all tops Set Area Map On
   

Walk Guide 51 for
Silvermines
Maintainer: beckett
Guide rating stars (Guide rating: 3.83)

MountainViews.ie Picture from walk Silvermines, Shannon
Overview
Walk length: 8.2km   Ascent: 280m   Duration (without stops): 2:40 h:mm
The Silvermines walk features a trek across the undulating ridge that runs from Silvermines East Top to West Top. The walk is not demanding and navigation is simple. The climbing effort is distributed throughout the walk with short climbs and descents as you make your way across the heather clad slopes following a discernible sheep track. The peaks have a distinct purple colour when the heater flowers and you may be lucky enough to see deer grazing in some of the wide forest rides. The old disused Silver Mine is visibly from the first peak and on your left Keeper Hill towers impressively as you make your way along the ridge. Two starting options are presented; the walk statistics presented are for option two which starts at the forest entrance. Those talking the first option which starts in the Silvermines village will need to add an extra 80 minutes to the time and an additional 280 metres to the ascent. This is an ideal walk for a summer evening when time is limited or for those looking for a gentle introduction to Hill Walking.
Points visited:
Start = R844 694 - Forest Ride = R843 694 - Silvermine Mountains E Top - Silvermine Mountains W Top - Cairn = R811 695 - Finish = R844 694
 (Guide last changed: 2007-05-28)

Preparation
OS discovery map 59 will be required for this walk.

Approaches and Parking
From Limerick follow the N7 until you see a clearly marked turn for Silvermines Village. This will take you east along the R449, which runs directly through the village. From the north or east of the country you can go to Nenagh and then follow the R500 directly to the village. There are a number of options for starting the walk; the choice depends on how much time you want to spend on surfaced roads. If you donít mind walking on a surfaced road you can start at the beautiful village of Silvermines and then begin the walk up the steadily rising surfaced road over a picturesque stone bridge (R842 714 (Point A)). There are a number of other parking alternatives along this road with at a least two large car parks and parking either side of the forest entrance at the top of the hill.

MountainViews.ie Picture from walk Silvermines, Shannon
Safety
There are no significant safety concerns on this climb. The ground on the southern side of the ridge is steep, but not excessively so, with a few large crags that are easily negotiated. The road up from Silvermines is very narrow with room for just one car. There are a number of turning circles where you can pull in to let oncoming traffic pass, you may often have to reverse back a steep incline to reach these so take car and approach at a slow speed to minimise the necessity to do this.

Start Option 1, Village
On the Eastern side of the village there is a picturesque bridge over a stream (R842 714 (Point A)) which can be used as a starting point. This option adds an extra 283 metres ascent over a 2.7Km leg to the walk over a steadily rising surfaced road. The road forks halfway up the hill, you should continue on the more clearly defined right had route meeting the first car park shortly after rounding the bend.

Start Option 2, Forest
This option is for the purest, averse to surfaced roads; beginning at the entrance to the forest R844 694 (Point B), if you take this option you will have a modest climb of 280 metres spread evenly along the length of the walk.

MountainViews.ie Picture from walk Silvermines, Shannon
Forest Entrance
From the forest entrance follow the main path west to an intersection, take the south going path here (left) until you see a way marked sign (R843 694 (Point C)) pointing into the forest through a wide ride, there a few wooden steps at the start of this path. This is a popular spot for deer, so keep your eyes peeled as you begin a gentle climb. After 800m another way marked sign steers you to the right as the main rides dissolves into the wood a little further on. After 200 metres the path switches back to a southerly direction and the peak of Silvermine East Top becomes visible. The path structure is different from that shown on the map; so don't be surprised if you find it difficult to relate what you see on the ground to what is represented on the map. You eventually come to a fence, which is easily crossed at the point of intersection with the path.

Silvermines East Top
A broad path now carries you to the first summit (R833 694 (Point D)). Ahead you can see the ridge stretching out with the broad path narrowing into a faint sheep track winding through the heather. There is a slight dip before regaining a little height and then a significant descent as you lose 50m before beginning the ascent for West Top.

Silvermines West Top
On your left now you should see Keeper hill's northern face with gullies and streams producing clearly pronounced folds in the contours that rise steeply towards the Eagle's Nest. West Top is somewhat indistinct, but the scar of the old disused Silver Mine should be obvious to the North. The ridge steepens on the southern side now and Keeper Hill becomes more pronounced. The track winds on following the contour a feet metres below the top of the ridge.

Finish
The end point of the walk is a cairn 1km ahead off and some 30 metres below West Top (R811 695 (Point E)) , this is a nice spot for lunch before you contemplate the return journey, on the northern side there are a few crags that offer shelter. To the west the ridge continues, though gradually dissolving into lower lying farmland. From the cairn you can retrace your steps to your starting point.

Point A: R842 714 Point B: R844 694 Point C: R843 694
Point D: R833 694 Point E: R811 695 (turn area map On)
   


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 25 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Seefin: Tough slog
Kennyj 6 hours ago.
Made my first solo run in the Monvullagh/Comeragh mountains today,parked at the forest entrance at S264025 crossed the road at the culvert that crosses the small stream running along the roadway ...

  
Summit Comment
Cragnamurragh: Easy approach from Upper Kilbane
stroel a day ago.
From Kilbane village take the gap road towards Killaloe . 200 m far from the junction with the signposts you will see a house and a tractor road on the left hand side . Only one car can be parke...

  
Summit Comment
Gortnessy Hill: Not much of a walk
Aidy 2 days ago.
Pleasant (not dramatic) views, but for hill walkers, barely qualifies as a walk, let alone a hill.

Track
A circuit of the Brandon Group
mcrtchly 2 days ago.
This route covers most of the summits of the Brandon Group ( walk, Length:39.2km, Climb: 1931m, Area: Faill an tS

  
Summit Comment
Mullagh More: The Burren.
sandman 3 days ago.
Mullagh More situated on the eastern side of the Burren National Park the hill is a swirl of contorted limestone and is one of the most impressive landmarks in the Burren. The National Park has ...

  
Summit Comment
Keshcorran: The Harp of Corran
wicklore 4 days ago.
The name Keshcorran most likely means the Harp of Corran. In ancient Ireland Ďceisí was a harp-fastener. Corran was a Harper for the Tuatha de Danann. Legend says a woman named Deirdre was transfo...

Track
Caha Mountains: Above Castletownbere
Onzy 5 days ago.
A route deep in the Beara Peninsula, taking in Maulin, Lack walk, Length:11.9km, Climb: 716m, Area: Maulin, Caha Mountains (Ireland) Maulin, Lackawe

  
Summit Comment
Cronamuck: Exhausting, But Worth It
Aidy 5 days ago.
Cronamuck was my third peak of this walk, having started north of Lough Eske, and already taken in Croaghbarnes and Meenanea. I am constantly amazed at the length of some of the walks undertaken ...

  
Track
The Galtees Challenge
Jim Holmes 6 days ago.
This is the Galtees Challenge as hosted by the Galtee Walkin walk, Length:30.2km, Climb: 1648m, Area: Slieveanard NE Top, Galty Mountains (Ireland) S

Summit Comment
Meenanea: The Energising Effect Of Great Views
Aidy 5 days ago.
I visited Meenanea as the middle peak in, what was by my standards, a long, difficult walk from an unnamed road north of Lough Eske, over Croaghbarnes, and after Meenanea, to Cronamuck. By the ti...

  
Summit Comment
Cruach an Bhearnais: A Wild Landscape
Aidy 5 days ago.
Recently I've been trying to get to all the summits in the central Bluestacks, which are usually difficult to reach, being far from roads, and behind other mountains. On Sunday, I targeted Croagh...

  
Track
Slieve Beg and Cove
CaptainVertigo a week ago.
Hillwalking is unpredictable. High hopes can be dashed when walk, Length:14.0km, Climb: 716m, Area: Slieve Beg, Mourne Mountains (Ireland) Slieve Be


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 25 Next page >>