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Slieve Mish Area
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Caherconree Mountain Cathair Conraoi A name in Irish
(Ir. Cathair Conraoi [OSI], 'Cú Roí’s stone fort') Kerry County In Arderin, Vandeleur-Lynam, Irish Highest Hundred Lists

Height: 835m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 71 Grid Reference: Q73317 07260 This summit has been logged as climbed by 197 members. Recently by: Fergalh, Onzy, chalky, hugh_oc, guestuser, Rob_Lee, douginireland, conormcbandon, suiladoir, simoburn, Cobhclimber, redape99, dodser, bryanmccabe, gallybander
I have climbed this summit: YES (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -9.853696, Latitude: 52.203029 Prominence: 129m,   Isolation: 0.9km
ITM: 473296 607314,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Chrcnr, 10 char: Caherconre

A narrow but easily passable ridge connects this peak to its higher neighbour, Baurtregaum. Caherconree is named after a stone fort situated two-thirds of the way up its western flank, overlooking the mountain road called Bóthar na gCloch ('road of the stones'). This is an inland promontory-fort, consisting of a natural projecting ledge surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, the fourth side being defended by a stone wall. In legend this is the fort of Cú Roí mac Daire, hero of Munster, who was able to make it spin around at night to perplex any attackers looking for the entrance. The best known story connected with it relates how Cú Chulainn attacked the fort with the aid of Blathnaid, the daughter of the king of Man, whom Cú Roí had taken, none too willingly, for his wife. Blathnaid taunted Cú Roí that his fort was too small for such a magnificent chieftain as himself, and when the walls were down during the construction of bigger fort, she poured milk in a stream (now the Finglas River, from Ir. An Fhionnghlaise, 'the white stream') as a signal to Cú Chulainn that the moment was right to attack. For a fuller account of the story, see The Dingle Peninsula by Steve MacDonogh, pp. 31-33. Nor is this the hill's only legendary association. The summit is known as Fin Mac Cool's Table, while a rock feature on the northern ridge connecting to Gearhane is called Fin Mac Cool's Chair.   Caherconree is the second highest mountain in the Slieve Mish area and the 26th highest in Ireland.

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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Caherconree in area Slieve Mish, Ireland
Picture: Caherconree fort
 
a well fortified summit
Short Summary created by scapania  19 Oct 2010 Park about 100m north of the summit of the Camp to Aughils road at Q716 056 (Point A) and follow the path, marked by posts, up the valley to the east, onto the ridge and around to the impressively located promontry fort at Q726 066 (Point B). After examining the fort, head northeast up the gentle ridge to the summit cairn.

Alternatively, turn off the N86 about 200m west of Derrymore bridge at Q741 111 (Point C), up the narrow road until the road swings around to the left, with a cottage and a track on the right, where there is parking for a couple of cars. Head up the track, over a stile onto the open mountain and across the Dingle way. Follow a faint path to the right of the gorge of the Derrymore River, until you reach the second of three lakes high in the glen. Go right from here to a flat area around Fionn MacCool's Table, then pick a line diagonally left up through bands of rock and across the slope to reach the col with Bautregaum. From here head right up the ridge and around to Caherconree's summit.
Point A: Q716 056 Point B: Q726 066 Point C: Q741 111

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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Caherconree in area Slieve Mish, Ireland
Picture: Narrow grassy ridge going NE.
by simon3  9 Nov 2005 You can select from various ways to reach Caherconree depending on circumstance and weather. For long interesting Kerry views of far off mountains over shimmering seas go high level via Gearhane or Baurtregaum. For a fabulous enclosed glacial valley as mentioned by ssmith, walk upstream beside the Derrymore river. For history and the quickest route go up from Beheenagh Q713063 (Point D) past the promontory fort.

The summit has a small cairn, nothing much, but great views on a good day.

Much of the rock here is red sandstone, however there are a couple of variations of this. Immediately to the north of the top is sandstone with bits of various heat changed rocks. However around 500m north of the summit, there's a band of sandstone with roundish white quartzite stones, a bit like golfballs. As this erodes, these hard golfballs freed from millions of years being incarcerated in sand, start to roll around, no doubt to be washed down to the sea where, yes, they get stuck in mud or sand for another half billion years. Interestingly also, there is a huge fault line passing the summit and the north of Derrymore Lough which can be found extending 20km SW. The geological layers to the south of the summit are far lower than those to the north.

The photo shows the route NE towards Baurtregaum. As Seán Ó Súilleabháin says perhaps best not to visit in mist, though I would be more concerned about high winds.
Point D: Q713 063
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Caherconree in area Slieve Mish, Ireland
Picture: Dingle Bay shimmers beyond the snow covered fort of Cú Roí
 
In the Snowy Footsteps of Cú Chulainn
by ciarraioch  23 Oct 2011 During the Big Freeze on 2 January 2010, I slid to a halt by the traditional starting point on Bóthar na gCloch Q 716 056 at around 12.35, perhaps a little late to be starting given the short days. Following the line of poles, tramping upwards in snow was much more pleasant than the usual boggy slog, although the snow was nearly a metre deep in places. Eventually I gained the summit in weak mid-winter sunshine in Siberian temperatures. The batteries of the camera had to be warmed after every 10 seconds or so and removing gloves to do so was well-nigh impossible. The sacred mountains of the Kingdom were visible in their snowcapped majesty, from the Breasts of the Goddess Dana (Dá Chích Danann aka The Paps) to the south east, Drung Hill and Cnoc na dTobar to the south west, and Brandon to the far west. I sometimes wonder whether the visibility of these aforementioned summits, themselves the focus of prehistoric religious cults, may have influenced those who built the awesome promontory fort on the flanks of this mountain. I returned in fading light, the snow covered fort of Cú Roí an eerie sight as the sunset reflected in icy-calm Dingle Bay. I went for a more southerly line of descent towards the starting point, the deep snow facilitating what would otherwise have been too steep under normal circumstances. I arrived back at the car at 15.30, two attempts being required to get the car up the hill to on the return route to the south!
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Caherconree in area Slieve Mish, Ireland
Picture: Home
They were a hardy lot
by wicklore  23 Aug 2012 Caherconree Fort is situated on a spur jutting out westwards from the main Caherconree summit. It is often shrouded in cloud - perhaps this is why there is no similar photo to this one already uploaded. My photo shows the spur jutting upwards, and the Fort - the remains of a large protective wall - ring the back of the spur. The Fort can be nicely appreciated by approaching along the fine ridge from Caherbla, where exploring the Fort gives an excuse for a breather before continuing up to the main summit.

Standing on the Fort made me think about how hardy the inhabitants must have been - what was a lung-busting hike for me was their daily trip home! I wonder was it as windy and wild when they chose this place as home?
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by ssmith  29 Sep 2003 After a beautiful walk up Derrymore Glen, a tough climb left me on the col between Gearhane and Caherconree. I moved on to stand on the summit of Caherconree, decorated with a cairn, and little else, before moving on to Bautregaum which is a wonderful climb and one of the best views anywhere - where else can you see Banna Beach and Inch strand with just a turn of the head? I spent the rest of the day walking down the unnamed peaks heading for the Tralee side of the Slieve Mish range, wonderful walking and I finished with about a 3 mile walk back to my car in Derrymore via the Dingle Way. All in all a fantastic day in the hills and highly recommended.
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Caherconree in area Slieve Mish, Ireland
Picture: Caherconree Fort from the summit
 
by Peter Walker  12 Sep 2007 A wonderful viewpoint. Done as part of a round from the N including Baurtregaum (the connecting ridge from the col to Caherconree would need the most howling of gales to render it tricksome; the sides are grassy rather than craggy, and not that steep) and Gearhane. Hopefully it's not everyone who tickles the fancy of the insect life like we did......
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(End of comment section for Caherconree.)

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British summit data courtesy:
Database of British & Irish Hills
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"ASTER+": Hillshade and Contours
Courtesy of Tiles GIScience Research Group @ Heidelberg University More detail here