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Carntogher Hill Carn Tóchair A name in Irish
(Ir. Carn Tóchair [DUPN], 'cairn of the causeway') Derry County, in Carn List, Olivine basalt lava Bedrock

Height: 464m OS 1:50k Mapsheet: 8 Grid Reference: C79642 06091 This summit has been logged as climbed by 36 members. Recently by: MichaelG55, susanc, Ulsterpooka, sandman, jlbrooke, Peter Walker, chalky, killyman1, seanmck, darky, pmeldrum, Welder, Garmin, AntrimRambler, RonnieI
I have climbed this summit: NO (You need to be a logged-in member to change this.)

Longitude: -6.759491, Latitude: 54.896134 , Easting: 279642, Northing: 406091 Prominence: 138m,   Isolation: 1.4km
ITM: 679573 906078,   GPS IDs, 6 char: Crntgh, 10 char: Carntogher
Bedrock type: Olivine basalt lava, (Lower Basalt Formation)

The causeway referred to may be that mentioned in Táin Bó Cuailnge. Conchobar, King of Ulster, sends his son throughout the kingdom to rouse the warriors to battle. He passed across a causeway before arriving in the valley of Dungiven. See Máire MacNeill, 'The Festival of Lughnasa' (pp. 148-49) for details of the festive assembly on Carntogher.   Carntogher is the 673rd highest summit in Ireland. Carntogher is the second most easterly summit in the Sperrin Mountains area.

Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/
COMMENTS for Carntogher 1 of 1
MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carntogher in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: 'Exactly as it says on the tin'!
 
eflanaga on Carntogher, 2007
by eflanaga  25 Oct 2007
Carntogher punches much more than its weight in terms of view and scenery available from its broad grassy top. Breathtaking views SE over the Lough Neagh basin and onwards to the Mournes, NE towards the Antrim Hills, North beyond Binevenagh & Lough Foyle towards the Innishowen hills in distant view, NW Donegal's western peaks beckon invitingly, while immediately west the Sperrins await your footsteps. Their is a 9k waymarked route (and a shorter one) called 'The Carntogher Way' which has a number of interesting, and rather helpfully signed, historical artefacts on its route. Carntogher is translated on an information board (at a layby near a bridge over the Pollan Water river) as 'burial mound of the raised pathway' which is more or less as Paul translates it above. Much of the Stone Age summit cairn named 'Carn Mullaigh ón Chlochaois' (? 'summit cairn of the aged/old stone) is dated circa 3000-4000 BC on the summit signpost. My translation is probably wrong but Paul Tempan will put me right I'm sure. Apart from the summit cairn, which is mostly covered by the abundant grass there is another cairn called the 'Immigrant's Cairn' below the summit and further down the route there is a bronze age 'cist grave' at the side of the track. A relatively easy walk which should only take a couple of hours dependent upon how long you spend viewing the artefacts or taking in the splendid views. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/2874/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carntogher in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Carntogher Summit
Harry Goodman on Carntogher, 2010
by Harry Goodman  4 Mar 2010
On the first occasion I climbed this hill I did so as part of a linear walk from the top of the Glenshane Pass along the ridge of hills to Benbradagh above Dungiven. On the second occasion, 9 February 2010, I decided to include it as part of a walk around the Carntogher Way starting from the Car Park at C8184504530 A which is reached by taking theTirkane Road out of Maghera. Having walked NW along the road for some 800 metres I turned left across a stile ( C8119705002 B ) and followed the red waymarks up a good green road to the open hillside. While the track at times became a little less distinct it was easy to follow. Further up at a post marking Altkeeran Glen, C8042004723 C, the path turned to the right and continued up, over a stile, to a T junction at a much more defined stoney track. From here I turned left and followed the track along to its highpoint at C7958105814 D marked by "The Emigrants Cairn" a large cairn of small stones said to have been built by emigrants travelling to the port of Derry, who having reached the high point on this ancient road, left a stone at the spot which gave them a last look back at home before leaving for the new world. From here I climbed up the short rocky face to the flat top of Carntogher with its summit clearly marked by a large wooden post and small plaque (see photo). From the top the views around 360 degrees were splendid and encompassed the Donegal Hills, Sperrins, Mournes, Belfast and Antrim Hills. While I deciced to go out to Moneyoran Hill and back before continuing around the Carntogher Way it is possible to go back to the "Emigrants Cairn" and pick up the waymarked trail at C7963905824 E and follow it along the N flank of Carntogher to meet a well made stone track at approximately C801063 F. From here turn right and follow down to a T junction and minor road. I joined the same track on my return from Moneyoran Hill and followed it down as described. At the minor road I turned right C8218605651 G and followed it back to the car park. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/4468/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carntogher in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: View west towards the high Sperrins from Carntogher summit
 
Sperrin outlier wth long views
by slemish  20 Aug 2010
Carntogher is a hill I had been meaning to climb for a very long time as I can see it on my daily commute. It doesn't look like much from afar but as others have suggested, it punches well above its weight in terms of views. I parked at the car park on the Tirkane road from Maghera (819045 H). From here the stony track ascends all the way up to the Emigrant's Cairn and is well signposted by waymarkers. The track became somewhat muddier above 350m due to the recent wet weather which made the going tougher. It was however a beautiful day with excellent visibility. On reaching the Emigrant's cairn you turn right to ascend the last steep rocky section up to the 464m summit. This part of the hill is known locally as 'the Snout'. Beware of hidden drainage ditches on the summit, one of which I managed to fall into but no damage done luckily. It was incredibly windy on the summit but the long views held my attention. Carntogher's position on the outskirts of the Sperrins gives it an unrestricted 360 degree panorama. I won't go into massive detail but just say that most of Northern Ireland is visible - the Antrim hills, Lough Neagh, the Belfast hills, the Mournes, the Donegal hills and the higher Sperrins. Sawel in particular looked incredibly high from here. I was surprised to be able to clearly make out the distinctive profiles of Muckish, Errigal and the Aghlas to the NW. The hills of Islay were just visible across the North Channel to the left of Knocklayd. I drank in the views for some time enjoying the sunshine before returning via the track back to the car. A wonderful walk and a hill I'm sure I will return to in the future. Total trip - about 1 and a half hours. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/6037/
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gerrym on Carntogher, 2009
by gerrym  26 Jul 2009
Carntogher is litte more than a bump on the long line hills stretching down from the north coast - before the Sperrins turn east-west to follow the Glenelly valley and gain significantly in height. This probably explains why i have left it so long to pay a visit BUT i have to say the visit was well worth it.

Access is from Cotter Row carpark (819045) just outside Maghera, where there is an impressively large information board. A short and pleasant road walk crosses rivers and gives views of the steep northern side of Slieve Gallion through the hedgerow. Just as the minor road loses it tar a large stone pillar heralds the crossing of a stile and a green track (old coach road) along Altkeeran Glen. Height is gained gradually and markers show the way. A stout marker post is a good place to stop and savour the view over Lough Neagh, the clear jagged line of the Mournes, Belfast Hills and the Antrim Hills - the eastern half of the North. The view only being interrupted by the black curtains of heavy showers sweeping across.

Follow alongside the river, where supermodel skinny thistles show off thier purple clothes range, to reach a stile and wall. Continue to follow the remains of this wall uphill. A little plaque has been placed just off to commemorate the crash of a cessna in 1943, where Commodore James Logan (US Navy), David Grimes (Vice-President Philco Radio) and Capt. Loren Miles (USAAF) died. I caught the sound of voices on the wind and saw some people ahead, thinking it was a group of walkers. It turned out to be 50+ people taking part in the provincial Poc Fada hurling competition. This involves hitting a sliotar (ball) over a course of 2.5 miles marked out over the mountain - the least number of strikes taken winning and going on to the All Ireland final in the Cooley Mtns. Fantastic sight and another for the list of uses for the Irish mountainside. It did mean i did have to detour off the track to avoid fast moving flying objects.

The summit has a large marker post on the summit cairn and with it the views open out to the other half of the North - Lough Foyle visible between Donalds Hill and Benbradgh, the big Sperrin hills heading west where i could clearly make out Muckish, Aglas, Errigal and Slieve Snaght. Reached in i hour and 2.5 miles. As i sat at the summit with a warm cup of tea an ominously dark cloud appraoched from Donegal and soon large raindrops were splattering into my cup before turning to hail which machine gunned into my back. It soon passed to join the other dark sweeps of rain which obsured and then revealed distant hills over the north. I continued on to Moneyoran Hill before contouring back over Carntoghter and following the track back to the minor road and the carpark.

An undemanding walk for an afternoon or evening, with a fair bit of history and some stunning views in the mix. Much more detail can be found at: http://www.walkni.com/d/walks/320/Carntogher_History_Trail.pdf Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/3967/
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pdtempan on Carntogher, 2007
by pdtempan  3 Nov 2007
In answer to your questions, Éamonn, Carn Mullaigh ón Chlochaois is not so much a name as a description. It means 'summit cairn (dating) from the Stone Age'. You are perfectly right about 'Tuama ón Ré Chré Umha': 'tomb (dating) from the Bronze Age'. I'm not familiar with Carntogher, though I've passed nearby on the Glenshane Pass dozens of times. I had heard very positive things about the initiatives taken by the Irish language community group in the area. Good to hear about these waymarked trails. Must pay it a visit! By the way, I can't claim the credit for the Irish form Carn Tóchair and the translation 'cairn of the causeway'. I gathered the place-name information for MV from various authoritative place-name surveys, though in a few cases I have offered my own suggestions where none was available from a published source. In this case the information came from A Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names (1999), written by my colleague, Dr. Patrick McKay. The 2nd edition of this book was launched recently. Another recent publication from the Northern Ireland Place-Name Project is Lough Neagh Places - Their Names and Origins (publ. September 2007) co-authored by the project's senior researchers, Pat McKay and Dr. Kay Muhr. Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/2881/
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MountainViews.ie Picture about mountain Carntogher in area Sperrin Mountains, Ireland
Picture: Cist Grave on the Carntogher Way
eflanaga on Carntogher, 2007
by eflanaga  25 Oct 2007
Here's a picture of the bronze age 'cist grave' which is on the Carntogher Way route. The signpost plaque beside it reads 'Tuama ón Ré - Chré Umha - (circa 1500 BC). Now as far as I can tell Chré Umha = Bronze age, while Tuama = tomb or grave, while if memory serves Ré is literally translated as 'era' - Era-Tomb? 'Old Tomb' ? - Need help with that one Paul, please! Trackback: http://mountainviews.ie/summit/567/comment/2875/
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(End of comment section for Carntogher.)

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