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pdtempan
2008-10-08 15:39:08
Townlands Highlighted On New OSNI Discoverer
Anyone who has recently bought a 1:50,000 map for areas north of the border will have had the pleasant surprise of finding the reverse side of the map printed as well as the front. The 2008 edition of the OSNI Discoverer Series includes a townland map and index on the back. For my money, this bonus more than makes up for the rather hefty price of £6. Townlands are unique to Ireland. They are sub-divisions of civil parishes and are the smallest administrative units in the country. There are approximately 66,000 of them. On previous editions of the 1:50,000 series (called Discoverer in the north and Discovery / Sraith Eolais in the south) some townlands were named, but boundaries were not marked. Coverage of townlands was good in mountainous regions (where they tend to be big, due to poor land quality) but in fertile agricultural areas and in towns, the coverage was sometimes as low as every third or fourth townland. The new Discoverer maps make it possible to identify the townland in which an archaeological site or hill-top is located, which is of great help if you want to look for further information. Previously you would have had to consult larger scale OS maps (1:10,000 or 6” to a mile) which are generally only available to the public at libraries and council offices. Most archaeological surveys and place-name surveys are structured by parish and townland. The new maps also help to promote awareness of townlands, which are rather nebulous entities for many city-dwellers and visitors to Ireland. Previously townland names were only distinguished from names of spot-features by the use of a different font. The marking of the boundaries makes them much more of a concrete reality. Townlands are still regularly used in postal addresses south of the border, and, although they have been somewhat undermined in the North by the introduction of postal codes in the 1970s, the Stormont Assembly agreed to protect and promote their use in addresses in 2002. OSNI is to be congratulated on this very positive initiative. Let’s hope that OSI soon follows suit.
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Summit Comment
Farbreague: from Arderin
ewen 5 days ago.
Walked to Farbreague from Arderin. There is a track that some kind soul has marked with sticks and ribbon. When I say track, it is really a worn down trough in the bog.The multicoloured pipe at th...

  
Summit Summary
Robber's Pass Hill: Minor heathery lump. Overcivilised and underwhelming.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 2 days ago.
This oddly named hill is more a very minor heathery bump incorporated into the system of tracks laid out by the Wicklow Mountains National Park. It can be reached from any of the western car-parks...

  
Summit Comment
Tonelagee: Fore!!!
ewen 5 days ago.
Did from the Wicklow gap car park following track 2378.This starts immediately opposite the top entrance to the car park next to the main road. 5 days before there had been snow but now the path w...

Summit Comment
Brandon Hill: Grand on Brandon!
MountainBoy 6 days ago.
Me and my Dad climbed this from the farm track off the Graiguenamanagh-Instioge road on 26/11/16. Right after we got out of the car, we were faced with the dilemma of whether to go straight ahead ...

  
Summit Comment
Croaghmoyle: Easy walk up to great views
Fergal Meath 6 days ago.
Low lying cloud/mist/fog discouraged me from putting the effort into going up Nephin today. On the way home I parked at the start of the Croaghmoyle service road and followed it past a wind turbin...

  
Forum: General
Slieve Binnian - more track work ?
gernee 4 days ago.
Revisited Slieve Binnian for the first time in years on Friday - frost underfoot, blue skies and rolling mist contributed to a great walk, despite disappointment at seeing some of the track work u...

User profile
ewen
ewen 4 days ago.
Now living furth of Scotland and getting to know the Irish hills. If you come across a Scottish hill Walker with dodgy knees and walking sedately, stop and say hello.

  
Summit Comment
Ben of Howth: Loop walk starting from Howth Harbour
Joshua3 6 days ago.
There is a nice loop walking signposted from Howth Harbour taking in the cliff path, summit and going close to the top of the Ben. The Black Linn walk is about 8 km and comfortably completed in un...

  
Track
Binnian-Lamagan Loop
David-Guenot a week ago.
walk, Len: 23.1km, Climb: 1364m, Area: Wee Binnian, Mourne Mountains (Ireland) ...

Track
Spelga Loop
David-Guenot a week ago.
walk, Len: 12.7km, Climb: 739m, Area: Pigeon Rock Mountain, Mourne Mountains (I...

  
Summit Comment
Carrigroe: Sea of cloud
Kennyj 6 days ago.
Unusual low cloud today heading towards Carrigroe

  
Summit Comment
Stags of Broadhaven (central): Climbing
IainMiller a week ago.
The Archipelago of the Stags of Broadhaven are a group of five steep rock islands with Teach Dónal ÓCléirigh rising to a height of 97m above the atlantic. The Stags live about 2.5km north of the c...


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