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GPS Unit found in .. by GSheehy   (Show all posts)
Hi folksSomething .. by Peter Walker   (Show all posts)
pdtempan
2017-04-02 23:59:12
Light and Shade
I've just spent a week on the slopes of Teide, the mountain which casts the largest shadow on earth, according to various sources for Tenerife tourist info. True or not, it was certainly true that we were not in direct sunlight until about 9.30 in the morning, about 3 hours after sunrise. Which has me thinking: the amount of sunlight an area gets is of great importance to farming communities. In French-speaking parts of the Alps and Pyrennes they use the terms adret and ubac to denote the sunny and shady slopes of the mountain. Adret seems to be from Latin ad dextrum, "to the south, south-facing", while ubac, or bac, is from opacus, "opaque, dark". In the Vosges the term envers is used for shady slopes. These differences determine where the snow lingers longest, where different crops can be grown, where herds of livestock are best kept, etc. I'm sure they must have been equally important to our ancestors and must have played a major role in coining place-names in Ireland. The various hills called Greenane or Greenoge denoting sunny spots (from Ir. grian, "sun") immediately spring to mind. But I wonder if some names on the MV lists are not more 'opaque' examples of this phenomenon. Buckoogh in Co. Mayo was interpreted as Ir. Boc Umhach 'eminence rich in copper' by John O'Donovan in the Ordnance Survey Name Book, but is there any evidence for copper there? It would be good to hear from anyone with local knowledge. The south-facing slope of Buckoogh gives the gentlest approach, while both the north-east and north-west slopes are significantly steeper. Could it really be Bac Ubhach, meaning something like "shadowy slope", where ubhach is an Irish form equivalent to French ubac? Looking on the brighter side (!), I think that some of our names with odhar or odhartha, usually understood as "dun-coloured, yellowish-brown" might well be yellowed precisely because they are weathered by the sun. Odhartha looks distinctly like an Irish form of French adret. Cashloura, a townland in the Shehy Mountains, is situated on the southern brink of a hill, so *caiseal odhartha, "sun-beaten fort" or "fort facing the sun" seems an apt description. Any thoughts and other examples?
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RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 18 Next page >>
User profile
magicstep
magicstep 3 hours ago.
A leisure climber, I take it easy. If I climb something big then in a good weather only and spend lot's of time on top of the hill picnicking, enjoying the views and taking pictures. Mostly I walk...

  
Summit Comment
Gortnagan Beg: A worthy 500
thomas_g 5 hours ago.
Gortnagan Beg turned out to be my 500th peak. The bog was dryish, the rain threatened but waited until I got back to the car and the midges had other targets; what more could you ask for.The peak ...

  
Summit Summary
Gortnagan Beg: Small hill with great views
Collaborative entry Last edit by: thomas_g 5 hours ago.
Gortnagan Beg might be diminutive in stature but has fine views and some steep ground.The best approach is from the NE where there is a stile on the roadside. Parking is scarce so the best option ...

Track
Gortnagan Beg from Cappanlea
thomas_g 5 hours ago.
walk, Len: 5.0km, Climb: 219m, Area: Gortnagan Beg, MacGillycuddy's Reeks (Irel...

  
Track
Galtymore & Galtybeg from King's Yard
conrad1179 a day ago.
run, Len: 11.8km, Climb: 670m, Area: Galtymore, Galty Mountains (Ireland) Galty...

  
Summit Comment
Kirikee Mountain: Kirikee from the NW.
simon3 2 days ago.
From the ridge south of Derrybawn there is this NW view of Kirikee.Courtesy of siteviewer_comreg.ie we can find the owner of this mast: Three Ireland.The amusing conjunction with the cairn below t...

Summit Summary
Camaderry South East Top: Steep climb, sorry trail, great views.
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 2 days ago.
There's a number of ways to reach the top such as starting from the main, paying, carpark near the Glendalough lake at around T1115 9635. Going straight up from here more or less north there is an...

  
Summit Summary
Brockagh Mountain SE Top: Flattish height NW of Laragh with views, boggy paths a
Collaborative entry Last edit by: simon3 2 days ago.
Situated at the south eastern tip of a spur from Tonelagee it therefore commands wonderful views out over Laragh to the south east and Glenmacnass valley and waterfall to the north. Glendalough is...

  
Summit Comment
Carrickarede: Island.
sandman 4 days ago.
Carrickarede island is connected to the mainland by the world famous Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge. One of Northern Ireland's top tourist attractions it is operated by the National Trust but unfortun...

Track
BRANDON HILL - THE QUICK WAY
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
A steep but quick ascent along the forestry on rocky terrain, along what I believe has been dug as a firebreak rather ... walk, Len: 5.0km, Climb: 305m, Area: Brandon Hill, South Midlands (Ireland) B

  
Summit Comment
Inishmeane: The concrete road thru the village
magicstep 5 days ago.
Part of the village, about 10 houses in total.

  
Summit Comment
Inishmeane: Not much to do, a tranquil place.
magicstep 5 days ago.
Visited in 2014. There's a sandy beach and a solid pier with slipway and a picnic table facing the mainland. The road from the pier all the way thru the village is a robust concrete one, but it's ...


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