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So.... I used the .. by madeleineblue   (Show all posts)
We camped in the V.. by kernowclimber   (Show all posts)
Looking at Jackill.. by wicklore   (Show all posts)
Scotchie - you hav.. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
We have
.. by jackill   (Show all posts)
dhmiriam
2011-09-02 20:13:06
"Sciathán gearradh." from dhmiriam Expand pics
Sciathán gearradh. (Expand pics)
Mountain Views
I have it in writing that ‘If you don’t climb the Mountain, you can’t see the View’, and on very good authority too. So while all eight of the Scavvy Seven took to the high road, the sub-culture did other things. From Newcastle pier, one gets a different take on the Mournes. The yacht club were out in force, the gulls stuffed full early, happy on the beach, a sure sign all was well abroad the water, and the weather up. The pier end littered with baskets, net and line, and a grey-blue–oyster-shell sea, shimmering light back off the sunken rocks all along the Newcastle road out of town toward Annalong. Winds filling the sails, the small boats skimming briskly along; in contrast, how it must have been, on high seas, pre-tourism, when the men went out to fish for dinner and their keep. Being a landlubber, I can only wonder what the Mournes look like from out across the water, so I go not to the boats but the books. E. Estyn Evans, in his chapter titled, ‘Luggers and Long Lines’, speaks of the fishermen from these areas who were also farmers, who knew these mountains intimately both from land and sea, their mountain views, truly panoramic. The landmarks these high grounds afforded the sea farer, were used to guide them to their fishing grounds and home again. ‘The names read like a poem. There are, for example, the Two Hills, the Blue Hills, the Three Tallies, and the North Mountain Foot; the Small Pike, the Long Land and Marleys-on-the-Ditch; the Horsemen, the Bleachyards, McVeigh’s-in-the-Glen, Rook’s Chimney, Henry’s Lumps, Nicky’s Easens, and the Old Mill Stump. ......The Horsemen, for example, are the tors on Chimney Rock, with the General leading the others, his horse’s back proudly curved against the clouds. Others have a delightful intimacy, based often on nicknames of long-vanished shore-dwellers, Nip-me-hip’s and Kibby’s Easens…..These, and marks such as the Rector’s Bushes and Issac’s-on-the-Hill, were guides to the inshore fishermen who were never far from land and knew its every curve, tree and chimney. One of the best remembered was Donal’s Light, described to me as “always burning behind a red blind in Donal O’Hare’s kitchen on the Lee Stone Brae.”’ Evans’ ‘Mourne Country’ makes for good company, when that has gone to the hills, and O’Hare’s was delightfully lit on return with gifts, recount, the declension of verb, sub-culture, the poets, vanishing acts, and most of whatever you’d be having yourself. Try the eight, and many thanks Cra, jackill, et al for great company on return.
Thanks to Cra and .. by dhmiriam   (Show all posts)
By KEVIN HUGHES - .. by CaptainVertigo   (Show all posts)
...it's gonna have.. by Conor74   (Show all posts)
Now here is a ques.. by jackill   (Show all posts)


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 24 Next page >>
Track
Half Galtee Crossing - Anglesborough to Cush and back
conrad1179 6 hours ago.
run, Len: 26.8km, Climb: 1845m, Area: Lyracappul, Galty Mountains (Ireland) Lyr...

  
Forum: General
"Very like a Whale"
BleckCra 10 hours ago.
The temptation for me Simon, as of course you know, to be drawn into a debate with you, is virtually irresistible but fortunately only virtually.Much in your post has little to dislike but far fro...

  
Summit Comment
Barranisky: Barniskea or Barniskey
Barry 2 days ago.
Might be worth adding that Ballymoyle Hill might be more appropriate name for this height. Called that in Coillte records. Whilst Barranisky is spelt thus on OS six inch maps, note that Hall Nevil...

Forum: General
The perpetual anti
simon3 23 hours ago.
Ah BleckCra we do miss your commentary expressed as always eloquently and amusingly. You have excelled yourself in double entendre with regards to Slieve Meelmore on this occasion. We thank you fo...

  
Summit Comment
Gubacarrigan: Coastal Hill
sandman a week ago.
Your options for parking are numerous but a lay-by is located at L7648192513. It only takes a few minutes to reach the cliff edge and on to the summit but as evident from the tracts along the edge...

  
Summit Comment
Westaston Hill: The top?
Barry 2 days ago.
I think the highest point is likely about 175 metres in a WSW direction from the mast. I'm judging this from aerial photography and DTM which shows a rocky outcrop in a small forest clearing. DTM ...

Track
Pic d'Anie
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
walk, Len: 16.0km, Climb: 1027m, Area: France, Nouvelle-Aquitaine ()

  
Track
Wild SE Inishmore
simon3 2 days ago.
This is a walk around the SE corner of Inishmore. The weather wasn't great so the photography was a bit limited due to d walk, Len: 12.8km, Climb: 161m, Area: Oile?in ?rann (Ireland)

  
Summit Comment
Rosgalliv Hill: Coastal Hill
sandman a week ago.
For the Mountain View members who will be joining Liz50 for her walk on 7/10/17 why not get there a few minutes earlier in order to visit this small hill with its Megalithic Tomb . Parking is avai...

Track
Pic et Lacs d'Ayous
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
walk, Len: 20.2km, Climb: 1113m, Area: France, Nouvelle-Aquitaine ()

  
Summit Comment
Rostoohy Hill: Coastal Hill
sandman a week ago.
The summit area with its hill fort and views across the bay.

  
Track
Pic des Trois Seigneurs
David-Guenot 3 days ago.
walk, Len: 9.7km, Climb: 904m, Area: France, Occitanie ()


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 24 Next page >>