Welcome to MountainViews
If you want to use the website often please enrol (quick and free) at top right.

General Whatever you want to say that doesn't fit under the comments about mountains or another forum.
Sort by >

More controls

<< Prev page 1 .. 171 172 173 174 175 176 .. 366 Next page >>
Post details Post   (Expand pics)
Thanks very much S.. by hbowman1   (Show all posts)
hbowman1 the dista.. by slemish   (Show all posts)
On the topic of lo.. by hbowman1   (Show all posts)
milo long distance.. by slemish   (Show all posts)
MCritchly's fine p.. by milo   (Show all posts)
Yes mcrtchly. Well.. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
There is a newscas.. by mcrtchly   (Show all posts)
A very rare opport.. by wicklore   (Show all posts)
Scavenger Walk 7 “.. by Bleck Cra   (Show all posts)
2011-07-05 15:55:21
"From humble beginnings..." from wicklore Expand pics
From humble beginnings... (Expand pics)
The Military Road: The infant River Liffey
The Military Road runs through the heart of the Dublin/Wicklow Mountains from Rathfarnham in South Dublin to Aughavannagh in deepest Wicklow. The road is 55kms long, and it was constructed between 1800 and 1809 in the wake of the 1798 Rebellion. It was designed to open up the wild Wicklow Mountains to the British Army to assist them in reaching the insurgents who were hiding there. A number of military barracks were built along its length which were used to house the soldiers who could rapidly respond when rebels were afoot in the area.

Today the road offers excellent access to the mountains around Glenasmole, Glencree, Sally Gap, Glendalough, Glenmalure and Aughavannagh. It is a great route to see and admire some of the best scenery in Dublin & Wicklow. But besides the mountains and valleys there are other things of interest along the road that are worth mentioning.

Just south of the Kippure Mountain access gates lies a small and non-descript bridge. You wouldn’t even notice you’re crossing it as it appears as nothing more than a few stones on either side of the road formed into little protective walls. As you pass in a flash you wouldn’t even realise that you have just crossed the infant River Liffey, which trickles into life about 700 metres further east in a lonely stretch of bog. This bridge, at O138 138 (OSI Map no 56) is the first of many that the Liffey flows under in its 125km journey through counties Wicklow, Kildare and Dublin before it meets the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay. ‘Flow’ may be the wrong word because at this infant stage it is barely a gurgling brook about 1 foot across.

By following the stream eastwards from the bridge through wet and boggy ground you will be entering a wide bog surrounded by higher bog to the south, east and north. It is a natural gathering place for the drainage of rain water from the surrounding area. At about O142 132 you can claim to have visited the source of the River Liffey. You are looking for a small pond that gathers water from all directions before it filters through a mass of bog and moss before reappearing as a stream – the first appearance of a distinguishable River Liffey. Of course there is wet and marshy ground surrounding this pond, and it all qualifies as being the source of the Liffey, but if you want to point to one definable feature and say “this is it”, then I would suggest this pond or the small bog holes beside it.

Geographically, this area lies in the saddle between Tonduff and Kippure. However being much closer to the summit of Tonduff, I would suggest that we could say Tonduff is the Mother Mountain from which the Liffey springs forth. Those of you not familiar with the Irish language may be horrified (or amused) to hear that Tonduff (Thoin Dubh) translates as Black Arse. So that’s where the Liffey comes from! The name Tonduff derives from the black bog and peat of the mountain, which appears as dark and brooding even on good days.

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 14 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Barnahowna: Fine-weather photo
bryanmccabe 4 hours ago.
Thought a fine-weather photo of Barnahowna summit was needed!

Summit Summary
Maumtrasna North-East Top: Worth a visit!
Collaborative entry Last edit by: bryanmccabe 5 hours ago.
Maumtrasna NE top, approximately 2km NE of Maumtrasna, is worth a visit in its own right. The most direct access is via the steep ridge up to nearby spot height 542. One possible starting point is...

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Summit No 2 of a fine ridge walk.
hivisibility 5 hours ago.
Here is another view of Crossderry taken from Mothillín. You can see the twin peaks at the summit area. The summit proper is the one on the right. Knocknabreeda in the background.Its pretty rugged...

Ott Mountain to Slieve Meelmore
Aidy a day ago.
Started at the Ott/Blue Quarry car park on the Moyad Road, and took a route taking in six summits, going over Ott Mou... walk, Len: 10.9km, Climb: 730m, Area: Ott Mountain, Mourne Mountains (Ireland)

Summit Comment
Mothaillín: Fabulous views to the west from the summit.
hivisibility a day ago.
Fine view towards Broghnabinnia and Caher from Mothillín summit.

Forum: General
Cable Car to the Hellfire Club - 20/10
cave-dweller 3 days ago.
Hello, There is a meeting being held in the Yellow House Pub in Rathfarnham in Dublin 14 tomorrow night at 8 pm about some proposed "redevelopments" in and around the Hellfire Club/Montpelier Hill...

Summit Comment
Mothaillín: Summit area as seen from Crossderry.
hivisibility a day ago.
Mothillín summit from Crossderry.

Glenbeigh to Galway's Bridge
GSheehy a day ago.
I?m putting this one up because it was a club walk and I was thinking about the other day. There aren?t too many clu walk, Len: 40.5km, Climb: 917m, Area: Glenbeigh Horseshoe (Ireland)

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Towards Knocknabreeda and Stumoa Dúloigh
hivisibility a day ago.
The view towards Knocknabreeda fro Crossderry summit. Stumpa Dúloigh in the background. Knocknabreeda summit is located over to the far left of the ridge.

Summit Comment
Crossderry: Summit looking East.
hivisibility a day ago.
Summit of Crossderry with view back towards Mothillín.There are 2 similar heights at the summit area. The summit is the one nearest the Eastern Reeks.

Peak bagging in The Sperrins in autumn
peter1 2 days ago.
Again, the use of a mountain bike is highly recommended for this route, if you are a solo walker. I left my bike in a... walk, Len: 16.2km, Climb: 1048m, Area: Mullaghclogha, Sperrin Mountains (Irela

Forum: General
Quad bikers in the Mournes
mcrtchly 2 weeks ago.
Whilst out in the Mournes on Sunday 2nd Oct, at about 8.30am we were shocked to see a group of half a dozen quad bikers powering up the track from the Banns Road towards Lough Shannagh (below Doan...

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS 1 2 3 .. 14 Next page >>