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jackill
2017-04-28 08:05:47
"Ham" from jackill Expand pics
Ham (Expand pics)
It's Simple Simon!
Seat Alhambra people carrier car type thing that he converts into a tent/bed to meet men in uniform
simon3
2017-04-28 07:16:18
"
'Ham ?? (Expand pics)
CaptainVertigo: Huge entertainment & mystery
Re CaptainVertigo
Yes, those pizzas can be a bit filling and what with middle age spread just look at the trouble you can get into.

However am I the only person puzzled by the reference to the 'Ham? Am I missing some important part of street cred? Should I forsake classical for rap lyrics?

Anyone else have any theories about 'Ham?
CaptainVertigo
2017-04-26 10:01:09
Close Encounters near Coomataggart
It was almost 2am last Saturday morning, as I turned the ‘Ham towards the Cork/Kerry border at Ballyvourney. An oncoming vehicle passed me by, ground to a halt, before turning and following me. The blue lights began to flash on the unmarked car. It was like the “landing scene” from Close Encounters of the Third Kind as I stepped out of the ‘Ham to face my accusers. In the excitement, I forgot that I had undone the button at the top of my jeans to ease the pressure on my pizza filled stomach (part of my high carb intake for the day ahead). The jeans began to slip from my hips as I walked towards the light. I was so glad that my white underpants had been recently washed with high quality detergent and wondered if the spinning light would have the same effect as the strobe lighting in a disco, with all my white parts becoming luminous. While I shielded my headlight-blinded eyes with my right hand, I fished for my declining britches with the other. The two fresh faced young Gardai invited me to re-enter the ‘Ham and speak to them through the open window. While there was undoubtedly a strong smell of pepperoni pizza wafting towards the law, I felt that the absence of alcohol would stand to my credit.

“Where did you come from?” “Trim”. “That’s a long way. Where are you going?” The Garda that asked the questions shone his torch into the back of the ‘Ham noticing that all 5 back seats were missing. “I’m going to the mountains…”. “In the dark?”. “Yes but I won’t start until first light”. “Are you taking any medication …prescription medication…have you “taken” anything at all?” “No, just a pizza” “And what will you do all night, while you’re waiting like?” I felt that he was using Cork dialect to put me at my ease. Before I could answer he said: “Do you want to sort yourself out “down there”?” All three of us stared at my nethers. As I struggled with the zip that had become jammed, the big fellow said again: “And what will you do all night boy?” “I’m going to sleep until first light”. “Is that a tent in the back?” “No, it’s my backpack…I’m going to sleep in the car” “Where’ll you park it?” “There’s a parking place beside the windmills on Coomataggart…I’m climbing all the higher mountains in Ireland and I have most of them done” “You must be worn out at this stage” said the quiet Guard. “Right go on…but be careful.” “I will”

Fifteen minutes later I was driving through the last section of boreen before the Coomataggart windmills, sheepishly. Despite the fact that it was a public road, there was a point where I seemed to be driving through a residential farmyard. The hounds of the Baskervilles, restrained only by chains, all launched themselves at the ‘Ham in a concerted attack barking savagely, as I sped through the yard towards the mills. Four pairs of mad eyes bobbed hither and thither in time to the yelps. I pictured the residents debating whether to phone the police, or tackle me themselves. As I lay in the back of the ‘Ham, I could hear the cacophony of barks from the yard playing away in the background, when, almost unbelievably, a donkey began to bray. At that very moment I felt the first of many intestinal twinges, and began to imagine a Noah’s Ark of demented creatures leaping upon my person as I would attempt to recycle the pizza that was wending its way through me.

http://mountainviews.ie/track/report/3441/
David-Guenot
2017-04-26 09:42:04
New blog !!
Here below is the link to my very first blog article, about a walk I had in the Pyrenees last summer. Do not hesitate to comment and subscribe.
http://lonepeakbagger.com/index.php/2017/04/25/pique-rouge-de-bassies-juste-fabuleux/
PS1: You can switch to English as the blog is entirely bilingual.
PS2: Next article should be about somewhere in Ireland...
GSheehy
2017-04-06 08:00:28
GPS Device Found
GPS Unit found in the Maumturks . Contact 086/8449239 for details.
Peter Walker
2017-04-05 21:07:32
"I
I'm sure they'll be very happy... (Expand pics)
Leave no trace...
Hi folks

Something that came up during the Mourne Outdoor Recreation Forum meeting in Newcastle last night...

Hopefully there'll be little disagreement with the statement that memorials on the hills are not to be encouraged. We can all sympathise with the feelings of the bereaved but those feelings are best not articulated in semi-permanent form on top of Slieve Donard.

It seems that such artifacts are on the increase again, but someone has taken it to the next level. This photo was apparently taken on the Brandy Pad beneath the Castles last Friday...
pdtempan
2017-04-02 23:59:12
Light and Shade
I've just spent a week on the slopes of Teide, the mountain which casts the largest shadow on earth, according to various sources for Tenerife tourist info. True or not, it was certainly true that we were not in direct sunlight until about 9.30 in the morning, about 3 hours after sunrise. Which has me thinking: the amount of sunlight an area gets is of great importance to farming communities. In French-speaking parts of the Alps and Pyrennes they use the terms adret and ubac to denote the sunny and shady slopes of the mountain. Adret seems to be from Latin ad dextrum, "to the south, south-facing", while ubac, or bac, is from opacus, "opaque, dark". In the Vosges the term envers is used for shady slopes. These differences determine where the snow lingers longest, where different crops can be grown, where herds of livestock are best kept, etc. I'm sure they must have been equally important to our ancestors and must have played a major role in coining place-names in Ireland. The various hills called Greenane or Greenoge denoting sunny spots (from Ir. grian, "sun") immediately spring to mind. But I wonder if some names on the MV lists are not more 'opaque' examples of this phenomenon. Buckoogh in Co. Mayo was interpreted as Ir. Boc Umhach 'eminence rich in copper' by John O'Donovan in the Ordnance Survey Name Book, but is there any evidence for copper there? It would be good to hear from anyone with local knowledge. The south-facing slope of Buckoogh gives the gentlest approach, while both the north-east and north-west slopes are significantly steeper. Could it really be Bac Ubhach, meaning something like "shadowy slope", where ubhach is an Irish form equivalent to French ubac? Looking on the brighter side (!), I think that some of our names with odhar or odhartha, usually understood as "dun-coloured, yellowish-brown" might well be yellowed precisely because they are weathered by the sun. Odhartha looks distinctly like an Irish form of French adret. Cashloura, a townland in the Shehy Mountains, is situated on the southern brink of a hill, so *caiseal odhartha, "sun-beaten fort" or "fort facing the sun" seems an apt description. Any thoughts and other examples?
Peter Walker
2017-04-02 14:43:15
"Ben Crom Reservoir" from Peter Walker Expand pics
Ben Crom Reservoir (Expand pics)
Mourne Outdoor Recreation Forum
The next meeting of this discussion body is being held on Tuesday 4th April, and I will be attending as a representative of MV.

If anyone has any concerns they would like airing at this meeting (which is attended by many interested parties, including landowners, land managers, outdoor recreation companies, walkers, runners, climbers and mountain bikers) then please message me on here.

These meetings are organised by the Mourne Heritage Trust (an organisation to which I have no affiliation, save my enjoyment of their cake trolley during these gatherings).
wwwalker
2017-03-27 17:59:51
Are there new cairns in Wicklow
Is it my imagination or are there some new cairns appearing in Wicklow recently. There are small ones at point 702 ( T043 980) marking the turn for the lugduff ridge and at T086 975) marking the descent point for the lead mines off the Camaderry ridge. Also a bigger one near Percy’s table on lug. Anyone else notice this and where are they coming from if new?
simon3
2017-03-27 08:12:18
Do your VITAL bit for hillwalking maps soon.
Ordnance Survey Ireland bring out a high proportion of the maps of interest to hillwalkers in Ireland. They are the only source of mapping for vast swathes of the island of Ireland. But since they brought out the 1:50000 maps in the 90's and the more recent 7 1:25000 maps various issues have become clear. In short there are omissions and incosistencies thay materially affect hill and coastal walkers. Think forest tracks, rides, outlines. Think hill walking-tracks. Think car parking both formal and informal. For the 1:25k particularly think extra
detail like landcover, placenames in two languages, walking tracks classification and mapping, accurate summit heights, corrected road classification, public/private road classification.

OSI
Good news appears to be here. They are now proposing to do new data capture. I.e. get new data from the real world and put it onto their maps. This is potentially the best news to have emerged from OSI in perhaps a decade. In particular they are consulting on what is needed with communities such as hillwalkers who are major users of their mapping.

Have a look at their survey.
http://osi.newsweaver.co.uk/Bluesky/drpmkwpuvml7ki0naubh7a?email=true&a=6&p=51677601&t=29153837
Consider the priorities on offer and any others you may have. AND PLEASE RESPOND by 7th Apr
This is the sort of opportunity that only comes up very very occasionally.


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 .. 14 Next page >>
Summit Comment
Knockalla: Try To Walk The Whole Ridge
Aidy a week ago.
I started at C247 336 and followed the good quality track up to the loughs in the centre of the ridge, then headed south west to the summit. The views there are stunning, taking in the sea channel...

  
Summit Comment
Tonelagee: Great views from the summit
jasonmac a week ago.
Only recently joined up as part of a personal challenge to get out and start hiking.Had a great walk in the late afternoon of Easter Monday from Glenmacnass waterfall area O1123 0303 B, crossed th...

  
Track
Nephin Begs: Tawnyanruddia
Onzy a week ago.
Route south along the Bangor Way to Tawnyanruddia.This was the plan B route for the day; the original intention had been walk, Len: 18.1km, Climb: 608m, Area: North Mayo (Ireland)

Summit Comment
Mullagh More: A spectacular landscape
Damian120 a week ago.
The trails are well marked out, I ended up doing the Blue Trail on a fine Easter Monday. This landscape seems to defy nature and hiking the Blue Trail this phenomenon is experienced every step of ...

  
Forum: General
GPS Device Found
GSheehy 3 weeks ago.
GPS Unit found in the Maumturks . Contact 086/8449239 for details.

  
Summit Comment
An Starraicín: A view from the lower northern slopes of Slievenea NE
Bunsen7 a week ago.
Quite admirable when seen from the north west

Track
Nephin Begs: Glennamong
Onzy a week ago.
walk, Len: 17.2km, Climb: 563m, Area: Glennamong E Top, North Mayo (Ireland)

  
Summit Comment
Slievanea NE Top: Two large coums in the western side of this
Bunsen7 a week ago.
The two coums are monstrous and house a series of lakes the second coum has a number of unnamed lakes on the OS map.

  
Summit Comment
Slievanea: Great views of Brandon and Lakes
Bunsen7 a week ago.
I came from the east across from Croaghskearda/Cnapan Mor. The route across is boggy but not difficult and mainly grassy bog.You could incorporate Cnapan Mor into a loop from the Conor Pass Car Pa...

Track
Glenveagh: Drumnalifferny North East Top
Onzy 2 weeks ago.
Route to Drumnalifferny NET from Glendowan valley to the south.A pleasant walk beginning with a careful river crossin... walk, Len: 5.0km, Climb: 306m, Area: Drumnalifferny North-East Top, Donegal NW

  
Summit Comment
An Starraicín: Arguably best appreciated from its northern side
Bunsen7 a week ago.
A distinctive peak noticeably spotted from the road towards the Conor Pass at the junction with Cloghane. By contrast, it looks very diminutive from the boggy plateau to the south.You will see a t...

  
Forum: General
Leave no trace...
Peter Walker 3 weeks ago.
Hi folksSomething that came up during the Mourne Outdoor Recreation Forum meeting in Newcastle last night...Hopefully there'll be little disagreement with the statement that memorials on the hills...


RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS << Prev page 1 2 3 4 5 .. 14 Next page >>